----- The Voice of Ireland's Fishing Industry and Maritime Community - Published Monthly, Established 1989 -----

Pictured at this year's BIM Seafood Retail Awards are Lar McCarthy, winner in the Independent Seafood Specialist award category BIM Seafood Retail Business Award 2018; Anne Stephens, The Fish Market, Maynooth, winner of the BIM Young Fishmonger 2018 (Independent Seafood Specialist); Scott Smullen, Dunnes Stores, Cornelscourt, winner of the BIM Young Fishmonger 2018 (Supermarket Seafood Counter) and Daniel Drwal of Tarpey's Super Valu in Cavan winners in the Supermarket category for the Seafood Retail Business Award. The Awards are designed to celebrate seafood retail managers that can demonstrate successful business models, excellent understanding of seafood, coupled with outstanding business and sales acumen.

THE NATIONAL MEDIA DOESN'T SERVE THE MARINE COMMUNITY WELL

On this week's FISHERIES PODCAST, Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, says that it's not only in times of tragedy that RTE, other national radio stations and the national press, should recognise the value of coastal communities.

Listen to the latest edition of the Fisheries Podcast here

Minister confirms to Deputy Pringle fishing penalty points to be introduced by Christmas

Deputy Pringle raised a Dáil question with the Minister for Agriculture regarding a fishing penalty points regime which Minister Creed has indicated will be introduced shortly. The Minister confirmed he hopes to introduce the regime by Christmas.

 

This edition of the maritime radio programme reports several interesting maritime developments, amongst them, the story of the seabird which links the tiny island of Rockabill off Skerries in North County Dublin with Kilcoole Beach in County Wicklow, Lady’s Island Lake in County Wexford and Dublin Port . It is one of the fascinating stories to be heard on this edition of THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme, which brings together the ‘community of the sea’ amongst listeners around Ireland. You will also hear how commercial companies have used the offshore islands in feature advertising to promote their products, but haven’t been readily making any payment to the island communities in recognition of using the areas. Every hour of every day, 40 people around the world drown, a startling figure, which John Leech, Chief Executive of Irish Water Safety says shows that drowning is a serious but neglected public health threat that claims the lives of 372,000 people a year worldwide. The programme will also take you aboard a unique icebreaking vessel which made a historic Northwest Passage in the Antarctic and report what it showed about climate change.

The maritime programme is presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.
The paper supports the programme.

Derval backs RNLI Reindeer Run for fitness, fun and raising funds for a good cause

Cork athlete, broadcaster and self-confessed foodie, Derval O’Rourke, says the RNLI’s Reindeer Run is the perfect opportunity to get fit, have fun and raise funds for a good cause. Derval is the charity’s Ambassador for the popular annual family event, now in its sixth year and being held in Cork’s Fota Park on Sunday 26 November.

Pictured at the launch of the RNLI’s Cork Reindeer to be held on Sunday 26th November at Fota Park is (L-R) Alex Fegan (11) Crosshaven lifeboat crew Vincent Fleming, Derval O’Rourke, Crosshaven lifeboat crew Maeve Leonard and Maggie O’Brien (12).

"Government Is Again Hammering Fishermen"
Creed Intends To Reintroduce Penalty Points
Legal Challenge Will Again Be Brought Against The State


“A Clear, Direct Attack On Fishermen”

“Why is this Minister in such a rush to step outside the Court system and all the safeguards that it gives to fishermen and to empower and allow the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority to go after fishermen however they see fit?”

Full report by Tom MacSweeney, Deputy Editor in our November issue in shops this weekend or online now via our digital subscription service

BIM hosts the annual Global Outlook for Aquaculture Leadership (GOAL) Conference
BIM strengthens of its sustainable aquaculture standard - CQA

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) recently hosted the Global Aquaculture Alliance’s annual Global Outlook for Aquaculture Leadership (GOAL) Conference in Croke Park, Dublin. The annual event brings together the world’s leading aquaculture thought leaders, producers and suppliers.

Speaking at the conference, BIM CEO Jim O’Toole said; “BIM is delighted to be the host of this year’s Global Outlook for Aquaculture Leadership Conference which provides a fantastic environment in which those in industry to exchange knowledge for the betterment of the sector.”

Yan Zhao, China Director at Ocean Jade Seafood, Hugh McBride, Marketing Director of McBride Fishing and Jim O’Toole, CEO of BIM.

At the conference, BIM announced that its quality standard for Irish aquaculture production - Certified Quality Aquaculture (CQA) - will enter the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) Benchmark Process.

BIM’s CQA supports the production of premium farmed seafood through a focus on quality, organic and eco labelling. The initial BIM CQA Standard Programme was formally launched in October 2001 and as of September 2017 there are 36 certified sites to the Scheme.

Hugh O’Malley and Elaine O’Callaghan, Achill Oysters.
Marianne and John Shine, Shines Irish Tuna.

The GSSI benchmark is based on United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (UN FAO) Guidelines for the Ecolabelling of Fish and Fishery Products. GSSI will give the BIM CQA standard and internationally recognised accreditation.

The Fisheries Podcast

Tom MacSweeney

The new MARINE TIMES Podcast Service
(click on photo to listen)

THE NATIONAL MEDIA DOESN'T SERVE THE MARINE COMMUNITY WELL

On this week's FISHERIES PODCAST, Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, says that it's not only in times of tragedy that RTE, other national radio stations and the national press, should recognise the value of coastal communities.

Listen to the latest edition of the Fisheries Podcast here

THIS ISLAND NATION radio programme is produced with the support of the Marine Times and presented by Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, reporting on the culture, history, tradition and developments of MARITIME IRELAND. Listen to the latest programme here.

 

This edition of the maritime radio programme reports several interesting maritime developments, amongst them, the story of the seabird which links the tiny island of Rockabill off Skerries in North County Dublin with Kilcoole Beach in County Wicklow, Lady’s Island Lake in County Wexford and Dublin Port . It is one of the fascinating stories to be heard on this edition of THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme, which brings together the ‘community of the sea’ amongst listeners around Ireland. You will also hear how commercial companies have used the offshore islands in feature advertising to promote their products, but haven’t been readily making any payment to the island communities in recognition of using the areas. Every hour of every day, 40 people around the world drown, a startling figure, which John Leech, Chief Executive of Irish Water Safety says shows that drowning is a serious but neglected public health threat that claims the lives of 372,000 people a year worldwide. The programme will also take you aboard a unique icebreaking vessel which made a historic Northwest Passage in the Antarctic and report what it showed about climate change.

As always, intriguing and interesting stories on THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme for MARITIME IRELAND.

The programme is presented here by
Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney


Pringle concerned for Donegal fishermen over new fishing penalty points system

November 1st, 2017: Deputy Pringle has received confirmation that Minister Creed is to sign a new Statutory Instrument introducing a penalty points system for fishing offences to replace the existing system. A Points Determination Panel will also be established comprising of three nominees from various agencies. Minister Creed has indicated he will shortly introduce the new system in response to a High Court judgement last year which deemed the previous system as flawed and not fit for purpose.

Deputy Pringle says he is concerned that the new system won’t address an anomaly that could potentially jeopardise the livelihoods of many Donegal fishermen if the penalty points system is not administered in conjunction with the prosecution process.

“The Minister last year committed to introducing a fair penalty point system however he has been silent on this occasion as to whether the new system will in fact fix the anomaly where fishermen are unable to get rid of penalty points on their fishing licence despite the courts finding them not guilty of an offence.

“I would urge the Minister to ensure that in the case where penalty points are applied to a licence without a prosecution, that adequate recourse to the courts is provided for in the system to ensure fair procedure is guaranteed. It is a basic principle in Irish law that recourse to the courts is provided for so there’s no reason why this can’t be applied in upcoming legislation.

“I will also seek further clarification from the Minister regarding the Points Determination Panel and whether this will facilitate or hinder a fair process. There has been no consultation with fishermen or the sector and I think fishermen across Donegal and elsewhere need that clarity before changes are made.

“There has been a lot of anger in the fishing community on the penalty points issue I’ve been raising this for over a year now firstly with Minister Simon Coveney and now with Minister Creed. I’ll be seeking a commitment from the Minister that consultation with the wider fishing community will be carried out and in the Agriculture Committee in the lead up to any changes to legislation to ensure that fishermen will be treated fairly under the new system” concludes Pringle.


Urgent Answers Demanded Over Early Closure of Coastal Waters to Prawn Fishermen with losses Valued at €6 Million

Sinn Féin Finance Spokesperson Deputy Pearse Doherty is demanding an urgent explanation from the Minister for the Marine over the decision by authorities to close the strategic Porcupine Bank fishing zone located off Ireland's west coast to Prawn fishermen.

October 16th 2017: It's understood that the decision to pre-maturely close the section of the Atlantic ocean shelf, which is amongst the richest prawn fishing grounds in the world, was taken last July with fishermen now claiming that the move has resulted in the loss of some six hundred tonnes of catch to Irish fishing vessels, estimated to be worth some €6M.


Politicians and Fishing

The major lesson of political evolution over the past few years is unpredictability. It is no longer possible to predict with certainty the behaviour of the electorate. Behavioural patterns by voters have shown that a candidate or party clever enough to use a particular moment or topic amongst them can gain election. Can that factor be used by the fishing industry and coastal communities?

READ THE FULL ARTICLE IN THE OCTOBER EDITION OF THE MARINE TIMES NOW IN THE SHOPS


Bord Iascaigh Mhara joins other EU coastal states to address Brexit concerns

Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, Bord Iascaigh Mhara, joined representatives from EU coastal states to emphasise the importance of fisheries in Brexit negotiations. At the meeting of the European Fisheries Alliance (EUFA) in Galicia, Spain more than 60 coastal communities across Europe signed a declaration requesting EU decision makers to protect the economic future of their communities during Brexit negotiations.

Speaking at the signing of the declaration this week, BIM Chief Executive Officer, Jim O’Toole said: “The €1.1 billion Irish fishing industry supports 11,000 jobs and is key to the social, economic and cultural composition of Ireland’s coastal communities. Our interdependence on Britain for access to waters, quota share and trade makes Brexit a serious concern for the Irish fishing industry. As Ireland’s seafood development agency, BIM is supporting the Irish Government and our own producer organisations to prioritise fisheries in Brexit trade negotiations.

“However, addressing the challenges will require a collaborative approach across all Member States and the European Fisheries Alliance is a welcome initiative in that regard,” concluded Mr O’Toole.

The futures of British and EU fishermen as well as the communities which depend on the industry are inextricably linked. While EU fishing fleets depend on access to what is to become UK waters for 42% of their catch, the UK industry exports 60 percent of its total catch to the EU’s single market.

A strong, vibrant Irish fisheries sector is key to delivering objectives set out under the Government’s Food Wise 2025 report which specifically cites a 70% increase in the value added to €13billion from the agri-food, fisheries and wood products sectors combined.

The full text of the Declaration of Santiago de Compostella can be found on the European Fisheries Alliance Website: https://fisheriesalliance.eu/


New visitor attraction overlooking Kenmare Bay to celebrate Ireland’s mussel industry
BIM launch the ‘The Mussel House’ as part of ‘Taste the Atlantic- a Seafood Journey’

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, in partnership with Failte Ireland, today (Tuesday, 12th September) officially launched a new visitor attraction on the ‘Taste the Atlantic – a Seafood Journey’ trail to celebrate Ireland’s rope mussel industry. ‘The Mussel House’ overlooking the stunning Kenmare Bay tells the story of an industry which began in the early 1970’s which is now valued at €6.5 million. The modern and sustainable rope-grown mussel industry is concentrated in the South West of Ireland and produces almost 10,000 tonnes of mussels grown on special ‘long lines’ for both the Irish and export market each year.



On this week's FISHERIES PODCAST, Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, suggests that you take a test to see how you would feel about being held to be guilty by the State even if a Court found you innocent and no - it's not happening in a foreign despot State. This is what the Minister for the Marine is proposing to do to Irish fishermen.

Listen to the latest edition of the Fisheries Podcast here


On this FISHERIES PODCAST, how much real interest does the Government have in preserving the offshore island communities? The Secretary of Comhdháil Oleán na hÉireann, Rhoda Twombly, tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, that it hasn't enough commitment to even use the word 'Islands'.

Listen to the latest edition of the Fisheries Podcast here


Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, recommends a book to the Minister for the Marine, his Department officials and politicians who made decisions which so heavily and badly affected coastal fishing communities. Preserving fishing and coastal communities does not get enough official support from Government and State. This book tells of the short-sighted policies and maritime blindness inside national agencies and how they rejected the cultural importance of fishing communities..

Listen to the latest edition of the Fisheries Podcast, by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.


Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority of Ireland Supports Molluscan Shellfish Safety Updates at Regional Information Events 2017

The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA), the independent regulator for the sea-fishing and seafood sectors in conjunction with the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), the Marine Institute and Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) are hosting a series of shellfish information events for the fishing industry around the country this October and November. Biotoxin sampling and reporting, microbiological classification, new legislation, Food Safety Management Systems, food incidents, new risks and exports are among the many topics that will be covered at the events, which are free to attend.


Fiction and Facts - It's Time the Fishing Industry Took A Stand

On the 4th of July this year the International Transport Federation and the Migrant Rights Centre Ireland made a presentation to the Joint Oireachtas Committee for Jobs and Enterprise about the alleged widespread abuse of migrant workers within the Irish Fishing Industry. According to Francis O'Donnell, Chief Executive of the Irish Fish Producers Organisation (IFPO), the Fishing Industry was dragged through the gutter once again and all kinds of allegations were made under the protection of privilege against the Irish Fishing industry and various agencies such as the WRC and the Gardai. The latter two are charged with policing the permit system for migrant workers.


€1.6m in EMFF Grant Awards for Aquaculture Investment and Research

Minister for Agriculture Food and the Marine, Michael Creed T.D., has announced the award of a further €1,574,611 in grants to 11 aquaculture enterprises and 4 third level research institutions in 8 different counties under the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) Operational Programme for the seafood sector. The grant awards will support total investment of €3 million in capital investment and applied research in the aquaculture sector. The grants are co-funded by the Exchequer and EU and subject to terms and conditions.

Minister Creed said, “I am pleased to announce a continued and increasing level of capital investment in our aquaculture sector which will underpin our ambitions to significantly grow our production in the coming years. I am delighted also to see recent efforts by my Department and BIM to encourage our third level institutions to become involved in the research agenda for the sector coming to fruition with three of our best third level institutions receiving approval for applied research to assist our sector in innovating and developing new technical knowledge to support the sustainable growth of the sector, together with two further industry research projects. This government is committed to building opportunities for those in coastal communities and the seafood sector”


Is The Sea Fisheries Amendment Bill Incoherent?

This week the Minister for the Marine, Michael Creed, made a major attack on the British Government, describing its approach to Brexit negotiations as "incoherent."

The Minister was very strong in his comments about the official British attitude. The Government there had "no coherence" around their strategy, he said.

His comments have not been particularly well received in British Government circles. They came at the same time as his policy towards the fishing industry in the context of the Sea Fisheries Bill was described as "unbelievable" as he continues with efforts to try to get it through the Seanad where it is at the Committee Stage.

"It is unreal that this is still going ahead," said the Irish Fish Producers' Organisation.

Could this be an "incoherent" policy approach by the Minister, or is it being forced upon him by his officials?

Those questions are being raised within the fishing industry because of the widespread repercussions which are feared as a result of the content of the Bill which, according to legal advice, could widen considerably access by all EU vessels within the 0-6 miles territorial limits. With British withdrawal from the EU and though the Government maintains that the Bill is an agreement only with Northern Ireland, that could be successfully legally challenged and used to apply to all other EU boats as the Irish Government will have no rights to make separate agreements with the UK and what is now being done in the Bill could be used to demand widen access to Irish waters for all EU fishing vessels.

This week's FISHERIES PODCAST examines the term "incoherent" as it might apply in the context of the Sea Fisheries Amendment Bill.


"DO WE HAVE FISH THAT GOOD AROUND IRELAND?"

Returning Irish holidaymakers impressed by European seafood, but did it come from Irish waters and could it be part of BIM's figures for increased landings, but not by Irish boats?

The topic of this edition of the FISHERIES PODCAST by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney


Ireland Could Learn a Spanish Lesson

The Marine Time's Deputy Editor reports that when the Spanish don't like Irish boats fishing off their coast, they don't hesitate to make it difficult for them. Ireland could take this as an example of how to control Spanish boats in Irish waters.

Listen to this edition of the Fisheries Podcast here.

 

BIM - Taste the Atlantic - 2017 from Bord Iascaigh Mhara on Vimeo.

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November 2017 Issue - Vol 30 No.06

November 2017 issue in all good stockists

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Editor: Mark Mc Carthy
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The Marine Times Newspaper is published by Marine Media Ltd.
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MFV Sunrise II off Dunmore East - Photo by Derek Hosie

Dermot Conway

The Danger of Spin
Fisheries Solicitor Dermot Conway writes that it is “nothing short of appalling to watch TD’s accept at face value all sort of nasty assertions being peddled about the fishing industry, without any questioning” and “a disgrace to see public representatives forming opinions based on ‘fake news’.

Art Kavanagh

Unity is the Key
BIM held their Annual National Seafood Conference in Galway on 29th June and there was a good attendance. Overall it was a good day and there was general agreement at least from those I spoke with that the atmosphere was good and positive.

We need to talk about super trawlers ...
Liadh Ni Riada, MEP

"In an effort to highlight the seriousness of what may be about to happen as a result of the “so called” public consultation on reviewing our fishing boat licence policy, a number of us fishermen have decided that we can no longer remain silent while PO’s, governments and state agencies continue to mismanage Ireland’s fishing industry for the benefit of a small number of players in return for political advantage."

Rogues Gallery is back - see page 30 of our September 2017 issue to see if you made the cut ;0) Photo above courtesy of William Power

"Sea Strike" by MaREI Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy

MaREI Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy, in Cork recently released a short fun animation with a message of significant impact, reminding us about our engagement with the ocean. With the opening statement "what has the sea ever done for us?" the film reports on 'the sea threatening to take strike action and was last seen heading to the moon disillusioned by how it was being treated on Earth'

 

Highlighting the importance of learning more about the ocean, Ciaran Kelly, policy, innovation and research manager at the Marine Institute congratulated the project team on the short film. "It is a novel animation which reminds us of how we all enjoy the benefits from the ocean both socially and economically, directly and indirectly; yet the film also provides a stark reminder of the fact that the ocean is not an infinite resource".

As an island nation, Ireland has a marine area that is ten times the size of its land area above the sea, and the majority of Ireland's population lives with 50km of the ocean. With a humorous element added to the short film, it demonstrates how we rely on the ocean for food and that over 50% of the oxygen we breathe came from marine plants in the ocean called phytoplankton. The ocean also supports many industries from fishing, aquaculture to energy and is a means for trade and transport, as well as providing us with the benefits of social and leisure activities generating a significant tourism trade.

Shared via social media, the film simply conveys information on complex scientific issues such as climate change and marine pollution it engages its audience in a way that relates to their everyday lives around the world and in Ireland. "To 'bring back the ocean', the film reminds us of our rich maritime heritage in Ireland. It promotes how taking small actions can create big impacts, from getting involved in beach cleans, to being aware of how we shop, as well as supporting research and innovation, can all improve the impacts on the ocean resource," Kelly further said.

Supporting the national government strategy Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth – an integrated marine plan for Ireland, along with the objectives of the EU Blue Growth Strategy and EU Strategy for the Atlantic focusing on ocean literacy, the Marine Institute has provided modest grants to a number of organisations to complete film projects about the ocean. The 2016 pilot media award grants for producing film pieces relevant to ocean literacy were also provided to:

Dearcán Media - John Philip Holland Documentary, English translation
Scannáin Inbhear - Bringing the "Atlantic" documentary to the classroom
University College Cork - Oceans of Life Animation
The animation "Sea Strike" was made with the support from the MaREI Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy and a Marine Institute Ocean Awareness Grant.

The Marine Institute is Ireland's national research agency for marine research, technology development and innovation, and is responsible for promoting the sustainable development of Ireland's resource through coordinated and focused research, leading to sound and accurate management advice for the Government, industry and the EU.


Scientists develop new technology to predict how marine life will fare in warmer seas

Using a novel system to conduct warming experiments in real marine habitats, scientists in Plymouth have demonstrated that seawater warming of the magnitude already experienced during ‘marine heatwaves’ causes major changes in underwater communities of microbes and animals.

Understanding the responses of populations and communities to climate change is a major focus of contemporary ecology. Most studies on the effects of ocean warming are based on observations in the natural world or on experiments conducted in highly controlled laboratory conditions. A research team, led by scientists at the Marine Biological Association (MBA) in Plymouth, designed and developed a system that allows for precise control of seawater temperature in situ, in order to experimentally examine the effects of warming on a diverse range of marine organisms in their natural setting.

Heated panels were suspended in coastal water and were colonized by a range of marine life. The scientists looked in particular at marine microbes (bacteria and protists), and at larger attached invertebrates such as sea squirts and bryozoans. The ‘heated settlement panel system’ successfully controlled seawater temperature in a marine habitat for 40 days, and the responses of marine microbes and invertebrates was examined. Seawater warming of 3°C and 5°C caused major changes in the diversity and abundance of the marine organisms studied, showing that complex communities are potentially highly sensitive to increased temperature.

Dr Dan Smale, Research Fellow at the MBA said “the surprising finding of the study was how very different groups of organisms, ranging from bacteria to sea squirts, responded similarly to the warming treatments. This shows how important temperature is in driving the structure of communities and suggests that temperatures experienced during extreme warming events alter biological diversity in coastal habitats.”


Study Finds Microplastic Pollution is Increasing on Irish Continental Shelf

NUI Galway researchers provide the first assessment of microplastic pollution in marine sediments from the Irish continental shelf

Friday, 8 September, 2017: Researchers from the School of Geography and Archaeology at NUI Galway have conducted the first study that investigates microplastic pollution of marine sediments on the Irish continental shelf. The study was published this week in the international journal Scientific Reports.

Pollution from plastic entering into the ocean is a global issue that impacts marine life at all trophic levels as well as economically important ecosystems. Microplastics (plastics smaller than 0.5mm) are widely dispersed throughout the marine environment. An understanding of the distribution and accumulation of this form of pollution is crucial for gauging environmental risk. In this study the researchers provide the first assessment of microplastic pollution in sediments and bottom waters collected from the Irish continental shelf. More specifically, this study investigated the history of microplastic deposition on the seafloor and examined how sedimentation regimes, proximity to densely populated areas, and maritime activities may impact microplastic pollution and deposition in marine sediments.

The results demonstrate that microplastic contamination is present along the western Irish continental shelf regardless of proximity to densely populated areas. The study found that a shallow layer of microplastics has formed along the Irish seafloor within marine sediments and their overlaying bottom waters. It also found a statistically significant trend of a rapid decrease in microplastic abundance with sediment depth within the fisheries near Galway Bay, which supports the assumption that microplastic deposition is increasing over time in this area. All recovered microplastics were classified as secondary microplastics as they appear to be remnants of larger items; fibres being the principal form of microplastic pollution (85%), followed by broken fragments (15%). The range of polymer types, colours and physical forms recovered suggests a variety of sources that may originate from plastic polymer fishing gear or land based contributions from nearby industry, water treatment plants, or households.

Dr Audrey Morley, senior author of the study and lecturer in Physical Geography at NUI Galway, said: “The pervasive presence of microplastics on the Irish Sea floor bares significant risks for economically important Irish fisheries, for example the Galway Bay Prawn (Nephrops Norvegicus). A previous study from Scottish fisheries has shown that prawns tend to ingest high concentrations of microplastic fibres when exposed to this type of pollution.

“Our results show that the Galway Bay Prawn fishery may be experiencing high exposure to this form of pollution with potential detrimental repercussions for this species, including reduced fitness and potential reproductive failure. However, more research is needed to understand the mechanisms influencing interactions of microplastics with individual species and ecosystems.”

This research was an NUI Galway student-led investigation by Mr Jake Martin, a graduate of the Masters Programme in Marine and Coastal Environments: Policy and Practice within the Discipline of Geography. For his achievements he has received the Professor Micheál Ó Cinnéide Award for Academic Excellence and is the lead-author of this publication.

This research was funded by a GSI Short Call from the Geological Survey of Ireland and a grant-in-aid for Ship-time on the RV Celtic Voyager from the Marine Institute of Ireland.

To read the full paper in Scientific Reports, visit: http://rdcu.be/vECw

Recent Archives

Investment of over €400,000 for 13 Coastal Community Projects across Louth, Meath and Dublin

Minister of State at the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Andrew Doyle T.D. joined BIM, Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency and the North East Fisheries Local Action Group (FLAG) in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin to announce grant aid of €219,310 to 13 distinctive maritime projects across coastal communities in counties Louth, Meath and Dublin that will deliver a total investment of €434,337.


FLAG West Fisheries Local Action Group Strategy announces support for 33 distinctive community projects across Clare & Galway to the tune of €411,099

Seán Kyne T.D., Minister of State at the Department of Rural and Community Development and the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment with responsibility for Natural Resources, Community Affairs, and Digital Development today, Friday 14th July, travelled to Inis Oírr on the Aran Islands to announce the West Fisheries Local Action Group (FLAG) support for 33 projects along the Atlantic coastlines of counties Clare, Galway and the Aran Islands.


29 Local Community Projects to Deliver Investment of over €645,000 under EMFF South East Fisheries Local Action Group Programme

Minister of State at the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Andrew Doyle T.D. announced the latest tranche of funding under the Southeast FLAG, Fisheries Local Action Group programme at a reception in the Arklow Bay Hotel in the coastal fishing town of Arklow in Co Wicklow this morning Monday 10th July.


South West FLAG Strategy - 10 Fisheries Local Action Group Projects to Deliver Investment of €162,000

Newly appointed Minister of State at the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport with special responsibility for Tourism and Sport, Brendan Griffin T.D. announced the South West FLAG, (Fisheries Local Action Group) Strategy at a seafood breakfast in the award winning Jack’s Coastguard Restaurant in Cromane, Killorglin, Kerry.


153 Successful Projects Worth €3.6 million Under EMFF Fisheries Local Action Group Scheme

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed, T.D. visited the renowned Ballycotton Harbour today (Thursday 8th June) to announce a range of successful projects that will deliver a total investment of €3.6 million under the innovative and inspiring Fisheries Local Area Action Group (FLAG) Strategy for Ireland’s 7 coastal regions. The FLAG Scheme is co-funded by the Exchequer and the EU under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) Operational Programme 2014-20. Over the duration of the EMFF programme, the FLAG Scheme will deliver €12 million in funding to Ireland’s coastal communities.


President Higgins Supports the Island Communities
News from the offshore islands from
Rhoda Twombly,
Secretary Comhdháil Oileán nahEireann

Summer is always a busy time and there is plenty of activity from the smallest to the largest of our Islands. But first off, I'd like to thank President and Mrs Higgins for the wonderful garden party they hosted in June at Áras an Uachtaráin for 400 Islanders.


SeaFest 2017 nets 101,000 visitors

SeaFest sees 68% growth in visitors numbers in one year