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MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 5th December

December edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed December edition is in all good shops and online now, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    This week’s Podcast is the first edition of Deputy Editor Tom MacSweeney’s new maritime programme, The Maritime Ireland Radio Show.

    This will be broadcast on 16 local community radio stations around the country, on three Podcast services and here on the Marine Times. There will be two editions each month.

    Listen to the Podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Fishing Still A Difficulty In Brexit Talks

    There is still no resolution in sight for the fisheries issues involved in the Brexit negotiations with the UK demanding that the EU concede 80 per cent of the fish quota European Union boats currently catch in waters that will come under its exclusive economic zone after January 1. The proposal has been estimated as reducing the value of EU boat’s catches from €650 million down to €130 million Coastal communities in several Member States would be very badly affected.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    South West FPO Criticises Barnier

    The Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation in Castletownbere has criticised the EU’s Chief Brexit Negotiator over a reported offer to the UK on catch share-outs in British waters after Brexit. “We learned, to our horror, from media reports that Michel Barnier had offered an 18% increase in their share-out of these Fish Stocks to the UK,” said a statement from the South/West FPO.

    Read the full article here»



Dun Laoghaire RNLI rescue two missing divers »

On Tuesday night, 1st December Dun Laoghaire lifeboat station’s inshore lifeboat was requested to launch by the Irish Coast Guard to respond to reports of two missing divers near Bullock Harbour.

The volunteer crew of three launched swiftly into the darkness at 11:06pm and made their way in the direction of Bullock Harbour arriving on scene at 11:15pm. The crew quickly assessed the situation and started to search the area around the outside of the harbour. The two casualties, who had been carrying out night diving training, were quickly located exhausted and trying to make their way back to shore having been caught by fast flowing currents.

Researching History of Greencastle Fishing Fleet »

A team of retired fishermen has begun work on creating a history of the boats that have fished out of Greencastle over the years.

The group will be operating out of the Inishowen Maritime Museum, in Greencastle, and will eventually work with museum staff to create a digital archive of information on boats that operated out of Greencastle. The museum started out to create a list of Greencastle boats several years back but never properly got to grips with it. “Croi na Farraige” / “Heart of the Sea” is a FLAG funded project set up by Inishowen Community Media Network to record the reminiscences of those involved in seafaring and fishing in Inishowen.


Appointment of two Directors at Marine Institute »

The Marine Institute is pleased to announce the appointment of two Directors to the state agency’s Senior Leadership Team. Dr Ciaran Kelly has been appointed Director of Fisheries Ecosystems Advisory Services and Joe Silke to the position of Director of Marine Environment and Food Safety Services.

Optimism From Fish Farmers: There is reason for optimism in the year ahead according to IFA Aquaculture’s Executive, Teresa Morrissey. However, she says that Irish Aquaculture could achieve much more if there was advocacy forthcoming from regulatory authorities by working with the sector to further develop it, rather than against it.

Haddock & Dublin Bay Prawn Chowder with Leeks »

The Irish coastline of dramatic peninsulas and deep bays is surrounded by one of our greatest natural resources – the sea. These waters are rich in aquatic life and form an exceptional environment for Irish fish and shellfish to flourish. They also support a thriving seafood industry which is the life-blood of some of the oldest coastal communities in the country.

Whether it is Irish monkfish or trout, salmon or oysters, Dublin Bay prawns or Irish crab, look out for Irish seafood when in your local fishmongers or supermarket. You will then know that you are serving a meal that everyone will love and you are supporting your local fisherman too!


Reflective at Howth - Photo by Richard Guildea
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MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 28th November

December edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed December edition is in all good shops and online now, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    From next week the MARINE TIMES will broadcast a new Podcast by Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Following on the series of ‘THIS ISLAND NATION’ which ran for five years, a new programme is being launched which the MARINE TIMES will support by Podcasting it. The MARITIME IRELAND RADIO SHOW is being launched after analysis of response to THIS ISLAND NATION. It will be a discursive, reflective format, featuring interviews and features about the maritime sphere and its many, varied aspects.

    On the first edition the Chief Executive of Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, Sean O’Donoghue, will discuss life in the fishing industry.

    Podcast here next week»

  • NEWS

    Quick Rejection

    The British Government very quickly rejected the offer put forward on Friday by EU lead negotiator Michel Barnier that it “could accept a 15-18 per cent cut in its share of rights in UK waters.”

    “Derisory” was the description from the UK side to an offer which, though only made public Friday, was reported to have been introduced to the talks several weeks ago. The quick UK rejection reflected increased tension and disagreement between both sides. It was reported in the British media that British and EU officials said the offer was made some weeks ago.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    New Fisheries Act Becomes Law In Britain

    The UK’s first major domestic fisheries legislation in nearly forty years passed into law in late November as the Fisheries Bill received Royal assent following its ten-month transition through Parliament. The Fisheries Act 2020 gives the UK full control of its fishing waters for the first time since 1973, ending the automatic rights for EU vessels to fish in UK waters. It enables the UK to control fishing activity through a new foreign vessel licensing regime, according to UK Environment Secretary George Eustice: “This is a huge moment for the UK fishing industry. We will now take back control of our waters out to 200 nautical miles or the median line."

    Read the full article here»




MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 21st November

November edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed November edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Inshore Ban Divides Industry 

    Larger boats have increased their activities in inshore waters in the past few weeks according to the General Secretary of the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association, Alex Crowley, who talks to Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, on this week’s MARINE TIMES WEEKENDER PODCAST about the decision of Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue to lodge an appeal against the High Court’s overturning of the ban on vessels over 18 metres from fishing inside six nautical miles of the coast.

    Complaints have appeared on social media about bigger trawlers fishing inside bays and estuaries. The MARINE TIMES has received reports claiming that sprat was being “cleaned out” of Galway Bay by at least two big trawlers.

    Alex Crowley says that sprat is not the only issue and, responding to safety aspects raised by some owners of bigger boats and representative organisations, he responds that there are “two sides” to this and that smaller inshore boats have been forced to go out to deeper waters because of the impact of larger trawlers inside six miles.

    The issue, it appears, is clearly, a divisive one within the industry with inshore fishing organisations and environmental groups joining forces to support the reimplementation of the ban.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Marine Casualty Investigation Board Warns Against Alcohol And Mobile Phone Usage

    Two people lost their lives in two separate incidents when boarding their berthed fishing vessels last year says the Chairperson of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board in its annual report released this week.

    Claire Callan, Chairperson reports that the MCIB investigated ten marine casualties, double the number in 2018. Last year a total of six people lost their lives in the marine casualties under investigation while one person involved in a rowing incident at Thomandgate, Co Limerick was left with life changing injuries. Two incidents involving kayaks resulted in two fatalities. A further two died while engaged in recreational fishing. The Board was also involved in two shipping investigations with other States.

    The Chairperson refers to the involvement of alcohol and mobile phone usage: “Regrettably, as in previous years I must comment on incidents where toxicology results supplied by the Coroner’s Office reflected evidence of alcohol. While it is not always possible to definitively determine the exact cause of an incident the Board published two reports in 2019 where alcohol could have impaired the judgement and reaction times of the Casualties."

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    New Lifeboat Operations Manager at Wicklow RNLI

    Retired Garda Inspector Mary Aldridge has been appointed Lifeboat Operations Manager (LOM) at Wicklow RNLI following the recent retirement of Des Davitt. She will be responsible for managing all operational activities at the station as well as authorising the launch of the lifeboats. She joined Wicklow lifeboat Station as volunteer Deputy Launching Authority four years ago.

    Open Water Swimmers Must Take More Care

    The Coast Guard, RNLI and Water Safety Ireland have urged Open Water swimmers to take more care following an increase in the number of emergency call-outs to the rescue services from the sector.

    Over the past week eight separate incidents arose in the Dublin/Wicklow area alone, with a number of other incidents being reported around the country. Most people who participate in open water swimming do so safety but some and in particular those who are new to the sport may be unaware of important safety measures which can help them avoid getting into difficulty, according to a joint statement issued on Friday by the RNLI and Coast Guard.

    Read the full article here»



Explorers Primary school - climate action day »

Explorers Primary school joins international experts and leaders for Climate Action Day: Primary school students from St. Augustine's N.S. Clontuskert, from County Galway that had taken part in the Explorers Education Programme, recently joined more than 30,000 teachers and students from over 135 countries, along with world leaders and environmental experts including Dr Jane Goodall, President Juan Manuel Santos, and Sir David Attenborough, to celebrate Climate Action Day, an online event showing casing their solutions to climate change.

The Marine Institute's Explorers Education Programme team from Camden Education Trust and Galway Atlantaquaria have been developing a series of outreach materials for teachers and children to help inspire questions and solutions about climate change. The resources aim to generate ideas, and encourage the children to work together and create the capacity to solve real-world solutions and take action for a better world.

Lighthouse Storybook Charity Partnership Launched »

Earlier this year, the ‘Become A Young Storykeeper’ initiative, developed by The Commissioners of Irish Lights’ (Irish Lights) tourism and community partnership, Great Lighthouses of Ireland, and creative writing organisation Fighting Words, invited submissions of original writing inspired by lighthouses from young writers aged 7-12.

What followed was an incredible influx of stories, poems, illustrations, comic strips, song lyrics and even stop-motion animations. The unprecedented response from young writers around the island of Ireland and abroad quickly turned our original one-off digital magazine into a five-volume one!

Now, just in time for Christmas, Irish Lights is sharing the highlights of this exceptional writing initiative as an inspirational book.


€700,000 for RESEARCH PROJECTS »

The Marine Institute has announced funding of €700,000 for seven new Cullen PhD Scholarships over the next four years. Also; New scientific research on ferox trout in Lough Corrib & Lough Mask highlights the importance of conservation of this valuable trout stock

A new scientific paper entitled ‘The spawning location of vulnerable ferox trout (Salmo trutta L.) in the Lough Corrib and Lough Mask catchments, Western Ireland’ has been published in the Journal of Fish Biology by scientists from Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) in conjunction with the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research.

Ferox trout are large, long-lived, fish eating trout normally found in deep lakes; they are believed to be genetically distinct from normal brown trout, having evolved after the last Ice Age 12,000 years ago.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 14th November

November edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed November edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    “We are totally undervalued. Fishermen are more respected elsewhere in the EU than in Ireland.” 

    On this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST the topic discussed is the statement by the Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation of Castletownbere that the public, politicians and the mainstream media do not fully appreciate or understand fishermen and the fishing industry. Patrick Murphy says a negative attitude is too often taken towards the industry, rather than a positive approach which should highlight how vital it is as a food source, a national economic asset and an essential part of coastal and rural life.

    “Honest, decent fishermen whose families wave goodbye to them as they steam out to search for and catch fish deserve better than the way they are treated. We are totally undervalued. Fishermen are more respected elsewhere in Europe than they are in Ireland, he tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    No Tuna Fishing For Irish Fishermen

    "There is growing outrage in Ireland’s coastal communities at the spectacle of a flourishing bluefin tuna fishery in Irish waters feeding on spawning stock of mackerel, horse mackerel (scad), herring, hake, sprat, cod and other species. They are being fattened up in our waters, only to be caught by foreign vessels, making a fortune of money that should be enriching our fishers,” according to Sinn Fein’s Spokesman on the Marine, Pádraig Mac Lochlainn. He asked Marine Minster, Charlie McConalogue, and the Government to “urgently engage with their European counterparts to secure a reasonable share of the of the global bluefin quota set by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT).”

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Minister lodges legal appeal against Court decision to allow large trawlers fish inside Ireland’s six mile zone

    In December 2018, following a public consultation process in which over 900 submissions were received, the then Minister for Agriculture, Food and Marine announced that vessels over 18 metres will be excluded from trawling in inshore waters inside the six nautical mile zone and the baselines from 1 January 2020. A transition period of three years for vessels over 18 metres targeting sprat was allowed to enable adjustment for these vessels, as the sprat fishery is concentrated inside the six nautical mile zone.

    A Policy Directive was issued by the Minister to the independent Licensing Authority for Sea Fishing Boats under Statute and was intended to give effect to the measures announced by the then Minister excluding vessels over 18 metres in length from trawling inside six nautical miles.

    Read the full article here»



Clarity needed on fishing issues in Brexit talks »

Independent TD for Donegal, Thomas Pringle, says he fears those in Donegal’s fishing industry “will be hung out to dry” in Brexit negotiations between the EU and the UK. In the Dáil debate on Wednesday about Brexit negotiations Deputy Pringle said: “One area that I am very concerned about and that has been widely reported as a sticking point, is that of fisheries. With the apparent slowing of negotiations and possible deadlock on certain issues, I fear that those in Donegal’s fishing industry will be hung out to dry.”

Also: Declan Quigley of SFPA reports that an unusual xanthochromic (red-orange-yellow coloured) Cod was landed into Castletownbere and delivered to Niall Sabongi (Sustainable Seafood Ireland Ltd., Dublin) and; The warming of lake temperatures across Ireland and central Europe poses major risk to rare Arctic charr fish populations which date back to before the last Ice Age. A new study led by the Centre for Environmental and Freshwater Science at Dundalk Institute of Technology (DkIT), in conjunction with the Marine Institute, says it has uncovered evidence that identifies climate change as a major risk to increasingly rare populations of Arctic charr found in Irish lakes and other regions across Europe.

Book Launch of ‘Dauntless Courage’ »

Radio presenter Damien Tiernan will lead an online panel discussion (Wednesday 25 November at 8 pm) with ‘Dauntless Courage’ author David Carroll and Dunmore East RNLI volunteer crew members

WLR FM radio presenter, former South East correspondent for RTE and author of ‘Souls of the Sea’ Damien Tiernan will lead the panel discussion with the author of ‘Dauntless Courage’ David Carroll who will also be joined by Dunmore East RNLI volunteer crew members Brendan Dunne and Neville Murphy. The launch is coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the Glenmalure Tragedy which is featured in the book.

‘Dauntless Courage’: Celebrating the History of the Dunmore East RNLI, their crews and the Maritime Heritage of the Local Community. All proceeds from the book will be going to the local Dunmore East Lifeboat Fundraising Branch to support the saving of lives on our seas.


Half of fish in Shetland waters landed by EU vessels »

More than half of the fish and shellfish caught in Shetland waters is landed by EU fishing boats, while the local fleet gets less than one sixth. The stark figures are contained in a new report by Dr Ian Napier of the NAFC Marine Centre UHI that shows just how rich the island’s waters are, with a third of all fish and shellfish landed from UK waters coming from Shetland’s “Exclusive Economic Zone” (EEZ).

Drawing on official figures for an area of 127,000 km2 around Shetland, bounded by Faroese, Norwegian and the remainder of UK waters, Dr Napier calculated that local vessels landed 14% of the fish and shellfish by weight and 21% by value. By contrast, EU boats landed 56% by weight and 38% by value, with other UK vessels making up the remainder.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 7th  November

November edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed November edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Fishermen’s Concerns About Offshore Wind Farms Must Be Listened To 

    In the November edition of the MARINE TIMES the Chief Executive of the Irish Fish Producers’ Organisation, John Ward, says that the fishing industry needs to “keep a very watchful eye on the plethora of proposed new wind energy developments around the coast.”

    Plans for offshore wind farms are at an advanced stage with a number of potential fixed and floating operators examining sites along the coast from Dundalk in County Louth down to the Cork coast.

    Pearse Flynn is from a Cork fishing family, a successful businessman who sold previous business operations for a reported several billion dollars and set up Green Rebel Marine in Crosshaven, Co.Cork. This week his company announced a partnership with Fisheries Liaisons Ltd. which has been engaged in a range of marine projects.

    On this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST he talks to Tom MacSweeney about developing communication between fishing communities and wind developers.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Fishing Communities and Offshore Wind Energy Companies

    A partnership intended to improve communications between fishing communities and developers of offshore wind energy projects in Irish waters was announced this week. Green Rebel Marine was established in Cork to service offshore wind farms. It announced the “strategic partnership” with Fisheries Liaisons Ltd., with the purpose of becoming “a key factor in communicating with the wider marine and fishing community as development of offshore wind farms picks up pace.”

    “The relationship is designed to ensure coastal communities are consulted with in advance of any work and fully informed of the latest developments involving wind farm operations,” a joint statement said.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    RNLI Rescues at Castletownbere & Heir Island

    Castletownbere RNLI lifeboat in West Cork went to the assistance of a 27-metre locally-registered fishing trawler, with six persons onboard, located two miles south of Mizen Head on Wednesday night. A crewman had suddenly become seriously ill. The lifeboat was commanded by Coxswain Dean Hegarty and located the vessel west of Sheep’s Head. Conditions were difficult with a three metre swell and 25 knot south-westerly wind. Two attempts were made to transfer the casualty from the fishing vessel to the lifeboa, but were unsuccessful due to the conditions.

    Baltimore RNLI were called out to provide a medical evacuation on the morning of Friday 30th October from Heir Island off the coast of West Cork.

    The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 9.22am, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to provide medical assistance and evacuation to a man living on the island.

    Read the full article here»



sean o'donoghue interview »

“We have some of the best fishermen in Europe in the Irish fleet. They believe in what they do. I feel passionately about them, about their future. We must assure it. In fisheries you never get anything easy and you never get it quickly, but if you have tenacity you will get there in the end.”

From some 40 years in the industry, “at different sides of the table” as he puts it himself, Sean O’Donoghue must have acquired a unique understanding of the fishing industry. In my experience, he has strong views, well expressed and at times very critical of government policies. But he has seen the industry work with government when necessary. • Read Tom MacSweeney's interview with Sean in the November edition

Increasing Value and Sustainability of Aquaculture »

ASTRAL is a new EU-funded research project with a budget of nearly €8m. to increase value and sustainability from integrated multi-trophic aquaculture production (IMTA) by developing new, resilient and profitable value chains.

Ireland’s aquaculture sector produces 38,000 tonnes annually, a valuable food product providing employment in coastal communities. ASTRAL (All Atlantic Ocean Sustainable, Profitable and Resilient Aquaculture) involves farming multiple, complementary species from different levels of the food chain together for their mutual benefit.


Clifden RNLI to Benefit from New Children’s Book »

A unique new children’s book focusing on the local history and mythology of the North West Connemara region has been launched this week in Co. Galway, with a portion of the proceeds being donated to the Clifden RNLI lifeboats.

Local author and youth worker Marie Feeney has produced ‘From Our Ancient Land to Bountiful Sea’, an informative and often humorous collection of local history and folklore tales with illustrations by Gary Kendellen. These tales include accounts of the famous engineer Alexander Nimmo who designed many piers and bridges in the Connemara area and an educational yet entertaining blend of local history and myths that will appeal to locals and visitors alike.

No evidence for alleged ‘benefits’ of 3-mile limit »

There is no evidence that a three-mile limit around Scotland’s coastline banning fishing vessels with mobile gear would improve sustainability or raise earnings in the creel fleet. That is the conclusion of a new Scottish Fishermen’s Federation paper, SFF The 3 Mile Limit History Facts, on the issue which follows a sustained campaign by environmental NGOs and some creelers.

UK will climb global league table of fishing nations post-CFP: The UK would soar up the global league table if it followed Norway’s practice of landing more than eight in 10 of the fish caught in its own waters, according to a striking new study. Under the Common Fisheries Policy more than 70 per cent of the fish and shellfish landed from the UK Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is caught by non-UK vessels. This is down to the CFP guaranteeing access to EU vessels and agreements made by the European Commission with third countries.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 31st  October

November edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed November edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Stop Treating Fishers Like Fools 

    “Inshore fishers have been complaining about seals for decades now. If you take the time to listen and consider these complaints, you’ll understand there are two separate aspects to them,” says the Secretary General of the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association, Alex Crowley. The Government, politicians and the NGOs who claim to support sustainable small-scale fishing, if they truly do, should take the concerns of the fishers involved seriously and listen to them carefully, he says.

    In the November edition he writes: “The majority of fishers have no issues with seals eating fish or seals in general. Whales and dolphins eat fish and no one has ever heard fishers complain about them. Depredation by seals is the issue.”

    Alex Crowley of NIFA talks to Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, on this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST about this issue and the called made by 15 fishing and environmental organisations to Marine Minister, Charlie McConalogue, to reinstate the ban on over 18-metre boats fishing within six miles of the coast.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Fifteen Groups Make Joint Call For Restoration of 6-Mile Ban

    Fifteen fishing and environmental organisations have jointly called on the Minister for the Marine to reinstate the six-mile restriction on fishing for boats over 18 metres. It is the first time such a group has jointly signed a joint request. They are the National Inshore Fisherman's Association (NIFA) and National Inshore Fishermen’s Organisation (NIFO), Birdwatch Ireland, An Taisce, Cork Environmental Forum, Cork Nature Network, Coomhola Salmon Trust, Environmental Pillar, Friends of the Irish Environment, Irish Seal Sanctuary, Irish Whale and Dolphin Group, Irish Wildlife Trust, Oceana, Seas at Risk, Sustainable Water Network (SWAN) and Our Fish.

    Their letter says that the policy directive, introduced in 2018, “was one of the most important fisheries policy shifts in the history of the Irish state and was broadly welcomed as being the right decision from a social, economic, environmental and a social justice perspective” and was backed by expert analysis by the Marine Institute and the Bord Iascaigh Mhara.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Contracts Awarded for Seaweed Development

    Increasing demand at home and abroad for seaweed and seaweed-based products, fertilisers and animal feed to cosmetics, medicines and food is stated to be the reason for the award to three Irish consortiums of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts by the Marine Institute and Enterprise Ireland for the development of a national intertidal seaweed resource. The contracts will run for four months and will involve scientific observations by satellite, drone and light aircraft to produce accurate estimates of seaweed distribution and biomass, and improve our understanding of Ireland’s coastal marine habitat and ecosystems.

    Successful projects may then proceed to scaled-up demonstrations and wider regional resource mapping during 2021. Thirty-two countries actively harvest over 800,000 tonnes from wild stocks and natural beds annually. The Marine Institute says that commercial interest in the sector is growing.

    Read the full article here»



personnel problms not resolved "Militaristic Approach Causing Problems In Coast Guard" »

In the past month more contacts have been received at the Marine Times from Coast Guard Unit areas around the country complaining about ongoing situations where members alleged that, when raising issues of concern, the response has been to be threatened with dismissal. In all cases, those who contacted the paper were unable to allow their names to be used in public because of fears of action being taken against them by management.

The further contacts indicate ongoing personnel problems between voluntary members and Coast Guard management. Instances have been identified of officers in charge being replaced when they sought discussions over situations or issues with which they disagreed. Amongst the contacts and comments in the past month was an allegation that a “militaristic approach” had been adopted towards volunteers. • Read more in the November edition


Creating ocean champions in County Clare »

The Marine Institute's Explorers Education Programme's outreach team are now delivering a range of marine projects and seashore safaris in primary schools through blended learning, online activities and outdoor class visits, creating ocean champions around Ireland.

As part of the Explorers creating ocean champions initiative the team have been busy adapting their favourite marine projects and developing new content, for teachers and primary school children to use in the classroom. Each month we will be launching a new project and a series of new resources that the teachers and children can use. "We have really worked outside the box this term and the Explorer teams have done an amazing job coming up with projects that classes and schools can still take part in. This includes online engagement, personalised film messages, and traditional letter writing to name a few."

international news »

EU Member States, including Ireland, have been accused of “opening a backdoor to damage EU fishermen” by giving beneficial arrangements to non-EU seafood producers without questioning the quality or sustainability of this produce.

The Scottish Government says it needs at least stg£62 million annually to replace the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) after Brexit. The Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Rural Economy and Tourism, Fergus Ewing, raised the issue at an EU Exit Operations meeting with the British Government.Also; The governments of Liberia and Japan have signed a fishery grant agreement for the supply of 400 Yamaha engines to local fishermen in Montserrado, Grand Cape Mount, Grand Bassa and Rivercess Counties free of charge.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 24th October

November edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed November edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    The Latest On The Brexit Negotiations 

    A Covid-19 financial support scheme for rope mussel and oyster farmers has been announced by Minister Charlie McConalogue. It has been welcomed by the IFA.

    The MARINE TIMES PODCAST guest this week is Teresa Morrissey, IFA Aquaculture Executive who tells Tom MacSweeney what this development means for fish farmers.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    IFA Welcomes Covid-19 Support Scheme

    IFA Aquaculture Chairman, Michael Mulloy, has welcomed the announcement made to the IFA Aquaculture AGM onThursday by Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue that there is to be a Covid-19 financial support scheme for rope mussel and oyster farmers.

    "The impact of the Covid-19 crisis has been significant on the Irish Aquaculture sector. Shellfish have been particularly affected due to market uncertainty."

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Dramatic Rescue off Wexford Coast

    RNLI lifeboat crews from Dunmore East, Kilmore Quay and Rosslare Harbour were requested to launch on Tuesday 20th October after reports that a 4,000-tonne cargo vessel, the Lily B, had lost all power and was in danger of hitting rocks south of Hook Head in Wexford. The cargo vessel with a crew of nine onboard, was carrying coal when it lost power and came within a half a nautical mile of coming ashore on the Hook.

    Read the full article here»



Mission Atlantic »

The Marine Institute will join forces with international ocean experts from Europe, Brazil, South Africa, Canada and the USA to map and assess the current and future risks from climate change, natural hazards and human activities to Atlantic ecosystems.

Funded by a €11.5 million grant from the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme, Mission Atlantic will be the first initiative to develop and systematically apply Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs) at Atlantic basin scale.


international news »

EU Member States, including Ireland, have been accused of “opening a backdoor to damage EU fishermen” by giving beneficial arrangements to non-EU seafood producers without questioning the quality or sustainability of this produce.

Denmark’s Environment Minister does not think the country should expand its aquaculture. Minister Lea Wermelin has introduced two Bills to the Danish Parliament which seek to restrict the growth of the country’s offshore aquaculture sector; The Scottish Government says it needs at least stg £62 million annually to replace the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) after Brexit.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 17th October

October edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed October edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    The Latest On The Brexit Negotiations 

    The importance of fisheries was highlighted in the Brexit negotiations this week, with increasing threats from the UK side that they might “walk away” from them if a deal to British satisfaction was not agreed. UK fishermen are pressing their Government to take full control of UK waters. EU Leaders issued a strong message from their talks in Brussels that the UK would have to “compromise on the key outstanding issues,” of which fisheries is a major concern, if there was to be an agreement. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson responded that “unless there is a fundamental change of approach in that attitude, the UK will go for “the Australian solution.” By this he meant exiting without a comprehensive deal on future relations. The EU was on Friday reported to be highlighting the desire of the UK to keep access to EU energy sources and placing negotiating emphasis on that requirement in a possible trade-off forcing a concession on fisheries in return for this access.

    The MARINE TIMES PODCAST guest this week is Sean O’Donoghue, Chief Executive of Klllybegs Fishermen’s Organisation. He assesses for Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, the current state of the negotiations.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Inshore Fishermen More Worried About 6-Limit Reversal Than Brexit

    “The potential medium-to-long term negative impacts of the High Court ruling on the inshore sector are likely to be far more severe than that of any ‘No Deal Brexit’ particularly when looked at in terms of equitable access to fisheries resources,” says the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association. It has responded to the High Court ruling overturning a government ban on trawling by fishing vessels over 18 metres within a six-nautical mile inshore limit.

    NIFA has described the judgement as “deeply disappointing and “extremely worrying.” The Association has called on the Minister for Agriculture, Food and Marine Charlie McConalogue to reinstate without delay the Directive imposing the ban which, it said, created a huge opportunity for the inshore sector.

    The inshore sector says that, “if that opportunity is to be denied as a result of the High Court decision,” it faces an uncertain future and possibly a complete collapse.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Funding for New Marine Research Vessel for Ireland in Budget 2021 Confirmed (Again)

    Minister for the Marine, Charlie McConalogue T.D., has earmarked the construction of a new marine research vessel for the State in his Department's 2021 Budget. Originally funding was announced in 2018 for the 2019 budget by then Minisiter Creed, followed up once again in the 2020 budget.

    Making this years announcement Minister McConalogue said: "The budget provision will allow the Marine Institute to progress construction on the replacement of the 23 year old Celtic Voyager with a new 54m modern research vessel that will provide critical national infrastructure to enable Ireland to address the considerable challenges of Brexit and the Common Fisheries Policy as well as climate induced impacts on our oceans."

    Welcoming the news Dr Paul Connolly, CEO Marine Institute said: "The Marine Institute is delighted that work can continue on the replacement for the Celtic Voyager. This new vessel will enable Ireland to develop the best scientific advice possible to maximse economic opportunities for our coastal industries and communities and ensure a sustainable resource for them".

    Read the full article here»



Free Counselling to Fishermen & Families »

Relate NI is Offering Free Counselling to Fishermen & Families: The effects of Covid-19 and the subsequent lockdown have had a profound effect on people and their relationships. People talk about social distancing as the new normal, but for those of us who work at sea, being away from our loved ones and people in general is and has been our normal.

For Fishermen, staying at home for weeks and months on end is something you may not have done for many years. The nature of the industry means that when not at sea, fishermen are likely not earning. At the same time, the uncertainty of Brexit continues to loom above us all.

Two More Unusual Catches And A Warning »

A ‘Red Scorpion Fish’ was caught in the Celtic Sea off Co Waterford and a ‘Browned-off Black Sole’ in the Irish Sea off Howth. Two more unusual species caught in Irish waters.

The MFV Endeavour caught the rare Red Scorpion Fish while trawling in the Celtic Sea, It weighed 1.168 kgs, measured 37 cms. and is the sixth record of this fish in Irish waters. The first specimen weighed 1.12 kgs and measured 37 cms. and was taken by trawl during early December 2007 south of St John's Point, Co Down in the NW Irish Sea. Since then, four more specimens of similar size were recorded from the Celtic Sea, including three during 2010.

The “Browned-off Black Sole” was caught in October by the MFV Eblana - Skippers John and Brendan Lynch - in the Irish Sea off Howth, Co.Dublin. The specimen weighed 1.015 kgs and measured 425 mms.


new fresh fish traceability system for retailers »

Aldi is the first retailer in Ireland to test blockchain technology successfully to validate its corporate buying policy for organic and sustainably produced Irish seafood. Aldi and Verifish are participating in a pilot project with Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s seafood development agency.

Developed by Verifish and supported by BIM, the pilot blockchain project captures all information from catch through to the retail shelves. The goal of the project is to increase visibility in the supply chain bringing assurance to consumers.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 10th October

October edition in all good shops NOW!!!

The weekly news and comment review from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper. The printed October edition is in the shops now and online, covering all the major developments as reported by Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper.

  • Marine Times Podcast

    A Fishing Tradition Is Ended By New Employment Legislation 

    One of the oldest traditions in the fishing industry, hiring crew by ‘word-of-mouth,’ has been ended by new legislation which, with so much happening in the fishing industry at present, from the Penalty Points controversy to Brexit and the High Court rejection of the ban on larger trawlers fishing inshore waters, may not have been getting sufficient attention.

    Owners and Skippers must deal with changes that came into effect on the first of September in regard to Crew Lists, Medical Care and Repatriation insurance and crew contracts.

    On the MARINE TIMES Podcast this week Solicitor Dermot Conway, who has a lot of experience in dealing with fisheries issues, discusses these changes with Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney. They will impose more work on preparing for a fishing trip.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Department Warns of Brexit Damage to the Fishing Industry and Possible Trouble At Sea

    If the British Government forces the EU to concede to its declared fisheries policy for a Brexit Agreement, there will be huge negative consequences for the Irish fishing industry, with 16,000 jobs in danger, severe damage to coastal communities, the possible loss of nearly €600m. in exports and the potential of conflict at sea according to the Department of the Marine in its annual review of the fishing industry published this week.

    16,150 Employed in the Irish Seafood Sector

    16,150 people are directly and indirectly employed in the Irish seafood sector, many of them based in Ireland’s remote coastal communities where alternative employment options are limited, according to the Department of the Marine’s annual review of the fishing industry.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Another Marine Department Proposal Defeated In Court

    The Department of the Marine’s decision to exclude vessels over 18 metres from fishing inside the six-mile limit has been rejected in a High Court action.

    It was announced in December 2018 by then Marine Minister Michael Creed and brought into effect in January of this year. Inshore, smaller boat fishermen, had described it as a boost for their sector, larger boat fishermen criticised it and said it would force them farther from shore and make fishing more dangerous.

    Fishermen Tom Kennedy from Dingle and Neily Minihane from Castletownbere, both with 30 years’ experience, challenged the legislation, Policy Directive 1 of 2009, which had been the subject of a public consultation for which more than 900 submissions were received.

    Read the full article here»



waterford harbour: tides & tales »

Maritime yarns and anecdotes gathered over many years working at the ancient Waterford Harbour

The old Irish phrase 'Ó Ghlúin go Glúin' (from knee to knee) encapsulates how stories told to children on the knee of their elders are in turn passed along to the next generation by the same process.

But in the fishing community of Waterford, these tales or yarns were told to the author while drifting for salmon, in the company of fishermen. His father and other sailors had a bit of a reputation when it came to exaggeration, but over the years he has found more than a grain of truth in many of the stories.

Irish mussels honoured at the MSC annual awards »

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s seafood development agency, has been named this year’s MSC Ocean Hero at the Marine Stewardship Council’s UK annual awards, for its ‘outstanding achievement’ among MSC fishery certificate holders. The MSC UK Ocean Hero award recognises and rewards fisheries and organisations that have demonstrated exemplary leadership in the field of seafood sustainability and made a unique contribution to furthering the sustainability of fisheries.

BIM, the holder of three MSC mussel certificates in both Northern Ireland and Ireland, received the award on behalf of the industry, after paving the way for all mussels on the island of Ireland to become certified. The Northern Irish and Irish rope grown mussel fisheries were certified in 2019, which now means that 100% of mussels in Northern Ireland and Ireland are MSC certified. The state agency also holds the certificate for the Irish bottom grown mussel fishery, which achieved certification in 2013.


46 Recommendations Made to Improve SFPA »

The review study of the Sea Fisheries Protection Agency made 46 recommendations to “improve the effectiveness of the organisation,” according to the Minister for the Marine. The review was completed last April, but its content was not disclosed and full details have not yet been given.

Sinn Fein’s Spokesman on the Marine, Padraig MacLochlainn, as he had indicated he would do in the MARINE TIMES INTERVIEW in the October edition, asked Minister Charlie McConalogue in a Dáil Question this week “the status of the organisational review of the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority that was carried out and his plans to implement the recommendations.”

Connemara Cycling Challenge Boost for Clifden RNLI »

Clifden RNLI were delighted to recently accept the sum of €3774 raised by the Connemara based Twelve Bens Cycling Club after a unique and testing fundraising challenge.

On Sunday September 6th, 12 cyclists from the club undertook an innovative cycling challenge consisting of 12 laps of the ‘Sky Road’ loop, so called due to its steep hill climbs along the well known scenic route. Beginning and ending at the Clifden Bike Shop on Market St, the cyclists completed twelve laps of the 17 kilometre route which presented a testing 230 metres of elevation per lap.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 3rd October

October edition in all good shops NOW!!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    "Most blatant example of cynicism by politicians in a long time" 

    In the MARINE TIMES PODCAST this weekend the Chief Executive of the Irish Fish Producers’ Organisation, John Ward, describes the anger in the fishing industry over Penalty Points and the attitude displayed by the Taoiseach and Minister for the Marine towards fishermen.

    He tells Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, that this is the “most blatant example of cynicism by politicians in a long time,” but that despite the intense anger over the way they have been treated, there is still a willingness in the industry to discuss the issues involved rationally with the Minister and arrive at an acceptable resolution.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Fishing industry is simply apoplectic and won’t give up the fight

    The Taoiseach and Minister for the Marine have been described as “dismissive, contemptuous and glib” in their treatment of the fishing industry by moving “dastardly legislation,” against fishermen say the country’s four fish producer organisations.

    The Irish South and West FPO; the Irish South and East FPO, the Irish Fish Producer Organisation and the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, in a joint statement reacted to the Government’s defeat of a Sinn Fein motion in the Dáil on Wednesday which sought to annul the Taoiseach’s signing of a Statutory Instrument to reintroduce Penalty Points for fisheries offences.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Questions, Confusion, Irony – All About Penalty Points Again

    It has taken only a few weeks to break the relationship between the third Marine Minister appointed by the current Government and the industry. The reintroduction of Penalty Points for alleged illegal fishing is the source of the breakdown.

    There is no disagreement that a Penalty Points system is necessary. The EU insists upon it and Ireland could face fines and the denial of funding if such a system is not introduced. But there agreement ends.

    Read the full article here»



Two More Unusual Species Caught »

A Johnson’s Scabbard Fish was caught by MFV Cisemair while pair-pelagic trawling with the MFV Buddy M in surface waters (0-50 m) for Albacore SW of Mizen Head. The juvenile specimen, measuring c.40 cm was discarded after being photographed by Padraig Ring.

The MFV Argonaut IV (Skipper: Jonathan Kirwan, Clogherhead, Co Louth) captured a Black Sea Bream measuring 20 cm and weighing 400 g, while seine netting near the Kinsale Gas Field, off Co Cork. Jonathan remarked that over the last 4-5 years they had caught a few Black Sea Bream every summer in the same area, including a specimen weighing 1.1 kg last year, and that they seemed to be coming north every year.

Unstable Antarctic Glacier Sliding Into Ocean »

British Antarctic Survey scientists have reported that one of the largest, most unstable glaciers in Antarctica is sliding into the ocean due to hidden rivers of warm water that lubricate its underbelly. Hidden beneath the ice shelf, they are deeper than expected, some are more than 800m (2,600ft) deep.

Also; China, which had been the largest growth market for Norwegian seafood exports, have dropped sharply in recent months; Because warmer waters, predicted under climate change, will contain less oxygen, there could be major changes in where a wide variety of marine species, from vertebrates to crustaceans to molluscs will inhabit in the future.


paying tribute to Kilmore Quay RNLI »

A Wexford family has expressed thanks to the volunteers of Kilmore Quay RNLI who brought them to safety earlier this summer when their pleasure craft got into difficulty.

James Kehoe and his grandchildren Aisling, 13, Emily, 9, and Orla, 7, were rescued when their 7m boat broke down having sustained engine failure in Ballyteigue Bay, half a mile north west of Forlorn Point in county Wexford. The lifeboat under Coxswain Aidan Bates, went to the family’s aid and towed the vessel safely back to Kilmore Quay. Such was seven-year-old Orla’s delight at being rescued by the lifeboat, she has since created a scrapbook about her adventure.

International project Mission Atlantic »

The Marine Institute will join forces with international ocean experts from Europe, Brazil, South Africa, Canada and the USA to map and assess the current and future risks from climate change, natural hazards and human activities to Atlantic ecosystems.

Funded by a €11.5 million grant from the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme, Mission Atlantic will be the first initiative to develop and systematically apply Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs) at Atlantic basin scale. This unique IEA approach engages scientists, marine stakeholders, and resource managers, integrating all components of the ecosystem, including human activity, into the decision-making process.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 26th September

September edition in all good shops NOW!!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Take Aquaculture Seriously IFA Tells Government 

    Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue should be acutely aware that a commitment to implement all recommendations of the Independent Aquaculture Licensing Review must be matched by meaningful action and resources to achieve this. That is the view expressed on this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST by IFA Aquaculture Executive Teresa Morrissey.

    She tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, that there is still a failure at Government level to realise the importance of the aquaculture sector as a food source and as an economic asset of the nation. “For far too long,” the IFA Executive says, “the Irish Aquaculture sector has had to continuously innovate, face challenges and find resilience in finding its own niche with limited support from policy makers. We have numerous Government policy documents pledging support for the industry, setting targets for future aquaculture development to increase production and promises for reform of the aquaculture licensing system, but yet we await the realisation of any of these aspirations.”

    Listen to the Podcast here and read more in the October edition of the MARINE TIMES out next week.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Irish South and West To Challenge Constitutionality Of Penalty Points

    The Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation has decided to “challenge the Constitutionality of the new Statutory Instrument Penalty Points system.” This makes legal action unavoidable.

    Marine Minister Meets EU Commissioner

    For the first time since his appointment, the Minister for the Marine, Charlie McConalogue, T.D., met on Tuesday with EU Fisheries Commissioner Virginius Sinkevicius in Brussels. The focus of the meeting was on fisheries within the overall Brexit negotiations. The Minister a stressed the central importance of the fishing industry in Ireland, as an island nation, making it clear, said a Department press release, that Ireland’s industry is in a particularly precarious position as it shares its main fish stocks and its waters on three sides with the UK.

    Further Grant Awards by EMFF Fisheries Local Action Groups

    the award of further grants worth €1.2 million have been made to 56 local community groups and micro enterprises by the seven Fisheries Local Action Groups established under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Programme.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    New CEO appointed at Inland Fisheries Ireland

    The Board of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) has announced the appointment of Francis O’ Donnell to the position of Chief Executive Officer. Francis is currently Director of the Western River Basin District with IFI. He will take up his position in the coming weeks.

    Reopening of National Fisheries Colleges

    The BIM National Fisheries Colleges of Ireland reopened last month. The colleges, in Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork had temporarily closed due to restrictions put in place to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in March. The reopening coincides with the colleges' recent achievement of ISO 9001:2015 certification; the internationally recognised standard for quality management systems.

    Thanks From Marine Institute

    Marine Institute Chief Executive Dr Paul Connolly. has thanked the one thousand Irish people who took part in a Europe-wide citizen survey on the health of the oceans, coasts and inland waters.

    Read the full article here»



Dauntless Courage »

Dauntless Courage: Book Celebrating the History of the Dunmore East RNLI

Dunmore East RNLI has been saving lives off the South East coast since 1884. Since then Lifeboats based in the village have launched nearly 1000 times and saved over 305 lives and aided 1315 people in distress on the seas along the Waterford and Wexford coast.

David Carroll the son of Captain Desmond Carroll, a former Harbour Master in Dunmore is currently completing a book on the history of the Dunmore East RNLI Lifeboats and the community from which the crews are drawn. David grew up in Dunmore East and whilst moving from the village in his 20s to pursue a career he has always retained a great love for the maritime heritage he inherited growing up in the village. David has spent nearly two years researching this book which is now near completion.

Climate Change Threatens Aquaculture »

Aquaculture, freshwater and marine, employs over 21 million people worldwide and provides 46 percent of global fish and seafood production and 52 percent of fish and seafood for human consumption, according to the World Aquaculture Society.

Also; Ireland’s problem in dealing with aquaculture licensing has a somewhat similar problem in Iceland where the Independence Party has complained in Iceland’s Parliament that around 40 licences for aquaculture operations are still awaiting approval, the oldest going back to 2015; 90 percent of Canadians say that seafood companies should provide information to back up their environmental claims on product labelling. These could mislead shoppers, according to the ‘SeaChoice’ organisation which describes itself as a consumer watchdog, a partnership of three national conservation/environmental organisations.


Cork Scientists Making Sure That Cockles Survive »

Though they are more connected with Dublin, certainly in song through “cockles and mussels,” the future survival of cockles depends on a greater consistency in the study of the shellfish and how this research is communicated to the fishing industry, according to scientists at University College Cork.

Cockles are a well-known shellfish across Europe. It is a species valued for its meat, cultural symbolism and ecological value. Records of cockles can be found throughout history, from a wide range of sources including museums, scientific works and fisheries records.

first female lifeboat Coxswain in Ireland »

Denise Lynch, a volunteer lifeboat crewmember with Fenit RNLI in Kerry, has been passed out as an RNLI Coxswain. She is currently the only woman to hold the senior position on an operational lifeboat crew in Ireland and is the first woman to be appointed to the role in the country.

Denise began as a volunteer in 2001 and has served on both Fenit RNLI’s inshore and all-weather lifeboats and became interested in lifeboats as a primary school student when her class visited the lifeboat station on a school trip. From a prominent fishing family in Fenit, as a child, she knew and looked up to the lifeboat Coxswain and decided that when she was old enough she would join the lifeboat crew


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 19th September

September edition in all good shops NOW!!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Marine Minister Rejects Fishing Industry Request To Change Penalty Points Legislation – More Legal Action Possible 

    Minister for the Marine Charlie McConalogue has refused to change the Penalty Points Statutory Instrument re-introduced by the Taoiseach, Micheál Martin, despite the intense anger against government in the fishing industry. He conveyed this view to the industry at a meeting on Wednesday, despite his previous personal and political party, Fianna Fail’s, opposition to Penalty Points. Now that the Minister is in government, he has expressed a different view. It is possible that there could be another legal battle between fishermen and the government over this issue.

    On the MARINE TIMES PODCAST this week the Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation, Patrick Murphy, discusses this issue and Brexit. The public does not know just how badly the fishing industry has been treated by the Government, he says.

    "Fishermen risk their lives every day when they go to sea. They responded to the Government’s urging to continue fishing during the worst of the Covid-19 pandemic to supply food and got very little help in return.”

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    No Resolution To Penalty Points Controversy

    There has not been a positive resolution to the Penalty Points issue from the “Webex Introductory Meeting,” as it was described by the Department of the Marine, between the fishing industry and Minister Charlie McConalogue, held on Wednesday last.

    The Department issued a statement afterwards which said: “The Minister listened to industry concerns regarding the Statutory Instrument on points for the serious infringement of the Common Fisheries Policy. The Minister explained Ireland’s position and noted the commitment of all to effective controls to protect the valuable fishing resources in Ireland’s 200-miles zone and the need for the country to meet its EU obligations in the area.”

    The statement quoted Minister McConalogue: “I was very glad to have the opportunity today to meet with the fishing industry representatives. We had a very useful exchange on the challenges for the sector posed by the UK’s exit from the EU and the Statutory Instrument on Points. I intend to continue this close engagement with the fishing industry going forward.”

    However, that does not appear to be the full story.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    No Brexit Agreement In Sight And No Alternative ‘Plan B’ By Government for Fishing

    The four Fish Producer Organisations - Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation; Irish South and East; Irish South and West and the Irish Fish Producers Organisation; the Irish Fish Processors and Exporters Association and the National Inshore Fisherman’s Forum met Minister for the Marine, Charlie McConalogue, through the “Webex Introductory Meeting” on Wednesday.

    A Department of the Marine statement said afterwards that this was to “reconfirm the Government’s commitment to a Fisheries Agreement with the UK that protects Ireland’s fishing industry.”

    The statement note that “fishing industry representatives explained the very serious implications for the Irish fishing industry and our coastal communities of no fisheries agreement with the UK or any fisheries agreement which grants the UK’s demands for a greater share of fish stocks and restricted access to UK fishing grounds.

    Read the full article here»



Understand The Past To Help Predict The Future »

Scientists from NUI Galway, the University of Southampton UK, University of Bremen, Germany, and Bergen University, have returned to Galway after 24 days in the Nordic and Greenland Seas to investigate past climate change in the Arctic region

The Irish-led team of scientists was on board the Marine Institute’s RV Celtic Explorer monitoring and capturing a record of temperature, salinity and the carbonate system to improve understanding of essential climate variables and how they are recorded in geologic archives.

Tipping the Scales »

Morgan’s Fine Fish have launched healthy ‘Ready to Cook’ seafood meals. Morgan’s Seafood Kitchen, an exciting new range of delicious healthy ‘ready to cook’ meals, was officially launched with the help of entrepreneur and qualified weight management expert Karen Daly.

The innovative new range developed by Morgan’s Fine Fish, one of Ireland’s longest established seafood suppliers, meets the ever growing demand for quick, easy to cook nutritious meals for people on the go.


'love seafood' sneak peek of new consumer brand »

Seafish in the UK are introducing ‘Love Seafood’ to the seafood industry during a series of webinars, allowing businesses to hear from their marketing team on the new initiative's vision and strategy and how businesses can get involved.

Also; The international aquaculture industry united virtually for the much-anticipated results of the 2020 Aquaculture Awards. The awards recognise and reward the excellence that is vital to the continuing development of a sustainable worldwide aquaculture industry – highlighting the impressive array of talents, achievements, and technical innovations on offer within this fast-growing sector. Although there was no physical ceremony this year due to the UK’s ongoing coronavirus restrictions, there was plenty of celebration to go round with a record 14 winners announced for 2020.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 12th September

September edition in all good shops NOW!!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    “Root-and-branch review of Marine Department and all its agencies needed because of huge gap of distrust" 

    There is need for a “root-and-branch review” of the Department of the Marine and all its agencies.

    This is the view of Padraig MacLochlainn, Sinn Fein’s Spokesperson on Fisheries and the Marine on this week’s MARINE TIMES WEEKENDER. “The common denominator with every single person I have spoken to is their distrust with those at the higher echelons of the Department of the Marine and their disillusionment with them. I am really alarmed at the range of fishermen in every sector I have spoken to who have no confidence in those at senior levels in the Department. A huge gap of distrust has built up,” he tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Minister Tells Dáil He Will Meet Fishing Industry

    “I will meet the sector next week,” Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue told Sinn Fein’s Spokesman on Fisheries and the Marine in the Dáil on Tuesday evening during an exchange between the two men about the Penalty Points controversy.

    He indicated that he shared with the Deputy the “voice, contribution and what the sector has to say” on behalf of fishermen.

    Concern About SFPA Accountability

    There are serious concerns about the lack of accountability of the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority,” the Fisheries and Marine Spokesman of Sinn Fein told the Dáil.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Lack of Government Guidance for Fishing If No EU/UK Brexit Deal

    Amidst increasing concern that the UK Government is using fisheries as a ‘bargaining chip’ in the “on/off” Brexit deal discussions with the EU and uncertainty about how it will affect the Irish fishing industry, the question what State aid might be made available to the fishing sector is unclear.

    New SFPA Technology System

    The SFPA is to roll-out of a new IT system to support increased compliance with sea-fisheries regulations. “VALID" is a fully automated crosscheck system that will automatically verify data, including in real time.

    Read the full article here»



Decoration In Dunmore East »

A fisheries-themed mural has been painted on the wall of the SFPA Port Office in Dunmore East harbour. Fifth Year Ardscoil na Mara Tramore student, Sarah Rogers, designed the winning entry in an art competition to recognise and celebrate the region’s deep ties with the fishing industry

Also: The CEO of the Irish Exports Association has said there is an "enormous level of concern" over the UK Government's new draft legislation which could affect shipping of Irish produce; Five local Councils, in cities and counties around the country, are now considering banning what has been termed as the "killer inflatable toys" from local beaches.


‘Protect Fish’ Message Delivered to EU Commissioner»

The English organisation, Funding Fish, registered as a charity, has been supported by 300 scientific staff in European universities in a campaign message “Our Fish” delivered to EU Commissioner for the Environment, Oceans and Fisheries, Virginijus Sinkevicius, in Brussels.

Also; Mackerel were not found in Greenland, there was a reduction in Icelandic waters, but there was an increase in the central and northern Norwegian Sea, according to the annual survey carried out by those countries, by Denmark and the Faroe Islands of pelagic stocks in the North Atlantic; Norway’s Fisheries and Seafood Minister is to hold an “urgent industry meeting with fish farming companies to discuss “the rising number of salmon escapes over the past few months.”


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 5th September

September edition in all good shops NOW!!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    “We Cannot Understand the Mentality Behind the Unfairness to Fishermen" 

    The Chief Executive of the Irish Fish Producers’ Organisation (IFPO). John Ward, says the industry cannot understand the mentality which has shown “such unfairness to fishermen” in the controversial new Penalty Points proposals signed by Taoiseach Micheál Martin. On this week’s MARINE TIMES Podcast, he says that no meeting with the industry has yet been offered to discuss the situation, but is hopeful of a development in the week ahead.

    “We would like to think we could have a meeting with the Minister and some compromises can be reached,” the IFPO CEO says and that it is understandable that the newly-appointed Minister for the Marine needs time to deal with the issue. He tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, in the Podcast that he is prepared to accept that the Taoiseach has so much to deal with nationally that he may have been “blindsided by his officials” into signing the Penalty Points Statutory Instrument.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Minister Needs to Listen to Stakeholders – Says New Marine Minister!

    “The Minister needs to listen to the stakeholders in the industry. He is in a position of leadership and needs to bring people in this sector with him.”

    Those were the words of the new Minister for the Marine, Charlie McConalogue of Fianna Fáil, in May when he criticised former Minister, Michael Creed and supported the country’s four fish producer organisations in their rejection of then Minister Creed’s Voluntary Fleet Tie-up Scheme during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    No Talks Yet Arranged On Penalty Points

    As at this weekend, no talks have yet been arranged between the fishing industry and government about the Penalty Points controversy. Castletownbere-based West Cork TD Christopher O’Sullivan told the Irish South and West FPO last Sunday that he would seek to arrange a meeting.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Former EU Commissioner Accused of Doing Damage to Lobster Fishery

    The Department of the Marine has not yet fully assessed the implications of the agreement which former EU Commissioner Phil Hogan agreed with the US. It has been hailed in America as “a great deal for our lobster industry.”

    But it does not appear so good to Irish lobster fishermen.

    “EU must support Irish Lobster Fishers following removal of US lobster tariff” – Chris MacManus MEP

    Sinn Féin MEP for te North West, Chris MacManus has called on EU authorities to announce financial supports for Irish fishers to be introduced following their Commission’s decision to lift previously imposed tariffs on live US lobster imports, criticising the decision where no consultation took place with Irish fishing representative groups.

    Read the full article here»



Coast Guard Require a New Fleet Of Vehicles? »

The Coast Guard may have to purchase a new fleet of vehicles because of problems which have been detected with a number already bought at a cost of nearly 1.5m Euros. The issue appears related particularly to volunteer units needing to carry heavy equipment, such as for use in cliffside situations.

Also; “The Summer of Inflatables” – Water Safety Ireland Chief Says They Would Welcome A Ban On Them. It has been called “the summer of inflatables” by rescue service personnel – the number of emergency calls to adults and children using what have been described as “killer” or “dangerous toy boats.”


another rare catch in irish waters »

While angling in the Shannon Estuary, off Cappagh Pier, Co Clare on 27 August 2020, Clive Morgan captured and released several Spanish or Axillary Sea Bream (Pagellus acarne). The specimens, which measured c.20 cm in length, represent the first confirmed records of P. acrane from Irish waters.

Although Spanish Sea Bream are commonly found southwards from the Bay of Biscay to Senegal (including Madeira, Canaries and Cape Verde Islands) and the Mediterranean, where it is commercially important, the species is regarded as extremely rare in NW European waters, particularly northwards of the English Channel. Indeed, since 1833, only 26 specimens have been authenticated, including the northernmost record which was captured during September 1966 off the Väderöarna Islands, Bohuslän, SW Sweden (Skagerrak) [58.6oN, 11.1oE].

Japanese MSC Tuna & land grown flat oysters»

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) decision to give its certification, the global standard for sustainable fishing. to a apanese longline tuna fishery has been has been met with criticism that it will “hinder the full recovery of one of the world’s most valuable fish stocks”.

Also; After two years of research a Tilapia breeding and genetics centre is to be built in the State of Tocantins in Brazil by the GenoMar Genetics Group. It will be the first of its kind for Tilapia species in the Latin American region; A plan to produce native flat oysters on land has been announced by the Orkney Shellfish Hatchery in Scotland.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 29th August

September edition in all good shops this week!!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Celebrating the Smaller, Natural Harbours 

    Ireland’s last traditional sailing and trading schooner, the ILEN, is carrying-out a community and cultural voyage “to celebrate the smaller natural harbours” of Ireland.

    Kinsale, Baltimore, North Harbour Cape Clear, Dingle, Kilrush, Foynes, Limerick City Kilronan in the Aran Islands are ports for the first stage of the voyage, “plying a time-honoured mode of sea trade.” Next month ILEN will go to the bigger ports of Cork and Dublin.

    On this week’s Podcast James Lyons who is the ILEN’s manager of the voyage tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, about the voyage “transporting cargoes of local food and beverage producers under sail by wind power, raising awareness of Ireland's ancient seaways, while exploiting their capacity for building relationships between coastal communities.”

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Cultural Values In Small-Scale Fisheries Management

    The cultural heritage associated with the sea, fishing and the small-scale fleets and how to value that contribution so that it can be accounted for in State decision-making and policies is to be discussed in a Webinar on Wednesday week, September 9, arranged by BIM. Free participation is available.

    Is Govt Still "Land-Bound" In Mentality?

    "More than they gave fishing vessel owners at the most difficult time in their history." That was some of the response from the fishing industry to the Government announcement of continued support for Social Farming under Rural Innovation and Development Fund. Is the Government still of "land-bound" mentality?

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Bord Bia Promotes Whitefish

    Bord Bia has launched a campaign to encourage consumers to eat Irish whitefish. “It is intended to support local fishermen by embracing whitefish for its local provenance and health benefits,” Bord Bia says. It has developed “easy-to-use home recipes” and points to the “health benefits” of eating whitefish.

    Third Oilfish Caught in Irish Waters

    Only the third oilfish caught in Irish waters since 1934 was taken by the trawler Cisemair out of Castletownbere about 80 nautical miles South West of the coast.

    RNLI Appeals for Local Business Support To Share Safety Advice

    The RNLI is appealing, through its local stations, to businesses to become RNLI local ambassadors by sharing key water safety advice to help keep people safe.

    Read the full article here»



Millions Arrive in Achill! »

It was described as “a rare and freak occurrence in Achill” when, on the evening tide, “millions of sprat came into Purteen Harbour and thousands of mackerel followed to feast on them.”

Also; Invasive chub have been confirmed in the River Inny in Longford, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).A single fish was caught on rod and line at one of a number of places where IFI staff recorded possible sightings following reports from members of the public. Chub are non-native to Ireland. They have the potential to compete with native species for food and space as well as be a carrier of fish diseases and parasites.

Drop In Landings By Irish Vessels »

Figures just released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) show that landings by Irish vessels decreased by almost 19,000 tonnes last year, a drop of 8.9%. Last year, 194,956 tonnes were landed by Irish vessels compared to 213,897 tonnes in 2018.


The statistics showed that ‘landings by Irish vessels into Irish ports dropped by 5.7% or 10,453 tonnes. Landings by Irish vessels in foreign ports decreased by 28.7% or 8,487 tonnes. Landings by foreign vessels in Ireland decreased by 22% or 29,091 tonnes.


coming in our september issue »

Killybegs Seine Netters - Shaun Shaun and Sharlisa: by Richard Mc Cormick, President Emeritus, Maritime Institute of Ireland

Having learned their fishing skills from their Dingle born father Paddy Joe Moore and their uncles Martin, Benny and Mossy, three Killybegs Skippers, Paidín, Hughie and Michael soon gained well-deserved accolades as ‘great men with the ropes’.

In the early 1980’s the prevailing trend in Killybegs was to build ever larger pelagic Refrigerated Sea Water tank vessels targeting mackerel, herring and scad, so investing in a brand new steel 50 foot (15.25m) whitefish seine netter powered by a 230 HP Gardner engine on the NW coast was a noteworthy event in the Irish fishing industry.

BRITISH POLITICIANS CAMPAIGN AGAINST SUPERTRAWLERS »

“The writing is on the wall for supertrawlers in UK waters" according to the international environmental organisation, Greenpeace.

Also; The Scottish pelagic industry is carrying out a project to improve knowledge of herring and provide data to ICES to assist in assessing the herring stocks and developing a rebuilding plan; Southern California and the Gulf of Mexico where waters are under Federal US control have been designated as the first two regions to be ‘Aquaculture Opportunity Areas’ by NOAA Fisheries, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 22nd August

August edition in all good shops NOW!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Lack of a Strong Voice at the Cabinet Table 

    Alex Crowley, Secretary General of the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association, outlines the crisis facing the sector on the MARINE TIMES PODCAST this week. He discusses with Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, concerns about future survival and the impact of the resignation of Marine Minister Dara Calleary on the Brexit negotiations.

    Mr. Crowley says that the lack of a strong voice at the Cabinet table, is seriously damaging. Members of NIFA have suffered a 50 per cent reduction of income and even more during the Summer months which are essential to survival as the industry faces into the Autumn, he says. The serious worry amongst those in the sector about survival should be understood by government and a stronger, positive, helpful response given, because the inshore fishing sector is vital for coastal areas, economically and in employment, he says.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Is a little Political Stability for Fishing too much to ask for?

    “What a disaster, the inshore fishing sector is in the midst of an unprecedented economic crisis. Is a little political stability in this portfolio too much to ask for?” That was the comment of the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association following the resignation of the Minister for the Marine Dara Calleary.

    The Minister’s resignation has caused concern throughout the industry because of the ongoing difficult Brexit negotiations.. It takes time for a new Minister to become acquainted with the brief. Former Minister Calleary had been engaged in his first round of EU contacts and other meetings were scheduled.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    New Water Stewardship Programme

    BIM is to launch a new Water Stewardship Support Programme this Tuesday, August 25, for seafood processors. The launch will be live-streamed for the sector at 9.30 a.m. Registration can be done on www.smartwater.ie/bim

    Largest Mass Stranding in Ireland of Bottlenose Whales

    Seven Northern Bottlenose Whales died in what has been described as the largest mass stranding of its kind in Ireland. The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) confirmed the deaths on Rossnowlagh beach.

    Water Heritage Day

    “Stories from the Waterside,” a collection of short stories celebrating individual connections with Ireland’s rivers, lakes and beaches has been published to mark Water Heritage Day which is this Sunday, August 23.

    Read the full article here»



Trade deal a 'kick in the teeth' for fishermen »

In what fishermen are describing as another kick in the teeth, Ireland’s EU commissioner, the EU trade commissioner, Phil Hogan has welcomed a trade deal that is likely to depress Irish lobster prices further.

United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and European Union Trade Commissioner Phil Hogan have announced agreement on a package of tariff reductions that will increase market access for hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. and EU exports. These tariff reductions are the first U.S.-EU negotiated reductions in duties in more than two decades. Under the agreement, the EU will eliminate tariffs on imports of U.S. live and frozen lobster products. U.S. exports of these products to the EU were over $111 million in 2017. The EU will eliminate these tariffs on a Most Favored Nation (MFN) basis, retroactive to begin August 1, 2020.

Tenders sought for Killybegs 2040 »

Donegal County Council is delighted to announce that tenders are being sought for Architect Led Design Team services to deliver regeneration project ‘Killybegs 2040’ through the stages of detailed design and construction supervision to final certification and handover.


This significant regeneration project has a value of €4.84m and is funded by the Department of Rural and Community Development under the Rural Regeneration & Development Fund, which is a flagship element of Project Ireland 2040. The project is the result of collaboration with the local community, Donegal County Council and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.


EU Mission Citizen Survey opens in Ireland »

The Marine Institute and the European Commission are inviting the people of Ireland to contribute to a better, bluer future for our ocean, seas, coastal and inland waters, by completing an online survey. Irish citizens can share what they believe are the top priorities for the health of our ocean and inland waters and how we can sustainably use and benefit from our marine and aquatic resources.

The online survey supports the European Union’s Mission for Healthy Oceans, Seas, Coastal and Inland Waters. The Mission aims to know, restore and protect our ocean and waters by 2030, by reducing human pressures on marine and freshwater environments, restoring degraded ecosystems and sustainably harnessing the essential goods and services they provide.

UK Fishermen asked to share impacts of Covid-19 »

Seafish, the public body that supports the £10bn UK seafood industry, will contact all owners of UK registered vessels to invite them to complete the annual socio-economic survey. The UK fleet survey asks questions about the financial and operational performance of fishing businesses.

Questions on the impact of Covid-19 are a major part of the survey this year. There will also be an opportunity for vessel owners to say how effective government support measures have been for their businesses. The fleet survey is usually undertaken by a team of researchers visiting hundreds of ports and harbours across the UK. Due to Covid-19 and challenges with travel and physical distancing, a different approach is being taken this year. Vessel owners will be posted a pack containing the survey form and guidance on how to complete it.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 15th August

August edition in all good shops NOW!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Kilmore Quay Catch of a Shocking Fish 

    The Kilmore Quay trawler, Tilly, caught a Marbled Electric Ray while beam trawling at a depth of 120 metres in the Celtic Sea last month. Relatively small, with a maximum length of 100 cms. and weight of 6/3kgs. it can be dangerous and has the potential to deliver an electric shock of up to 200 volts. It is common in the Mediterranean and along the European coast as far north as the Western English Channel. The Tilly’s catch was an adult-size female measuring 55 cms. and weighing 4 kgs. Taken by James Tate’s boat it is the westernmost-recorded catch of this species and has been donated to the Natural History Museum in Dublin.

    Declan Quigley, the Sea Fisheries Protection Agency Senior Port Officer in Howth, Co. Dublin, who has experience in aquaculture and fisheries research and has published 375 papers about his work, is our Podcast guest this week, discussing the unusual catch and its background with Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    The Value of Fishermen

    The value of fishermen and a fishing family in the community was well proved in the rescue by Patrick Oliver and his son Morgan off Inisheer in the Aran Islands on Thursday of two missing women paddle boarders. They had gone out searching, with their own calculation of to where the 17 and 23-year-old might have been taken by wind and tide after they disappeared having launched their paddle board at Furbo. Beach near Spiddal.

    Patrick is a member of Galway Lifeboat Station and his own daughters said that, when he heard the news of the missing women, he intended to help, as if it had been part of his own family who were in need of assistance.

    Read the full article here»

  • NEWS

    Recreational Crab Fishing Hitting Commercial

    Recreational pot fishing is now a contentious issue for commercial fishermen who claim that those engaging in “recreational activities” are fishing large amounts of pots, as well as keeping under-sized and V-notched lobsters for consumption, which is illegal and undermining the stock enhancement work of commercial fishing. It is claimed that ‘recreational opportunists’ are also declawing all crab, even those under the minimum landing size, which is also breaking current fishing regulations.

    There Is Money For A Lot Of Things But Not For Fishermen

    There is nothing specific and meaningful in the grants worth €1.2 million to 93 Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAG) Projects that will help the hundreds of inshore fishing enterprises which face a very uncertain future, says the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association.

    Read the full article here»



NUI Project to Investigate Superbugs in Swimmers »

A team of researchers at NUI Galway is calling on swimmers and surfers to take part in a project to find out if recreational water users are more at risk of picking up superbugs.

The Antimicrobial Resistance and Microbial Ecology Research Group at the University is launching the PIER study (Public Health Impact of Exposure to antibiotic Resistance in recreational waters), funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Researchers are hoping to recruit 300 people to take part – one group of 150 sea swimmers, surfers and people who regularly use the sea, lakes or rivers for recreation, along with a second group of 150 people who rarely take to the water.

News Round-Up »

Inland Fisheries Ireland and fishery owners are indicating that wild Atlantic salmon are returning in “record” numbers to rivers along the Atlantic seaboard. Western Regional Manager of the IFI, Francis O’Donnell, said there were high numbers of healthy fish on Galway’s Corrib, Mayo’s Moy and Ballisodare in Sligo.

Also, Dublin Port Company has abandoned its plan to develop new cruise berths as part of the North Wall Quay Extension under the port's Masterplan for development to 2040: and, From Wednesday next, August 19, maintenance dredging will be underway on all main shipping channels and berths in Cork Harbour.


INVENTOR CREATES REVOLUTIONARY WAY TO FARM OYSTERS »

A Polish man has quite literally turned oyster farming on its head - by inventing a revolutionary device that allows for three times more oysters within the same area of seabed. Grzegorz Skawinski developed the product over two years which uniquely has a rotating cage system.

Oyster sacks are placed one above the other, rather than traditional farming of side by side on trestles, saving space on the seabed and increasing production. And when the device rotates, it allows the oysters to move freely, aiding growth. Normally each oyster bag is turned by hand – five in a row on a trestle. Grzegorz’s system allows 16 to be turned in one rotation.

MVS helps rid beauty spot of harmful plastic »

A major milestone has been passed in an ambitious project to clear plastic debris from underneath the famous cliffs stretching between Eastbourne and Seaford and to stop it breaking down into small particles and polluting the sea.

Members of the Maritime Volunteer Service (MVS) have transported a large quantity of plastic waste from an inaccessible beach near Beachy Head, East Sussex, to Sovereign Harbour, Eastbourne, for proper disposal. The MVS responded to a request by Mr Norm Penney, founder of environmental group Beachy Head and Seven Sisters Extreme Plastic Objects Removal (BHASSExplore), for help.


MARINE TIMES - WEEKENDER: Saturday 8th August

August edition in all good shops this week!

A weekly review service from Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper which is published monthly.
Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Marine Times Podcast

    Dangerous Inflatables Should Not Be Used In Open Water 

    There have been several instances where the emergency services, fishing boats and other leisure craft and people ashore, have spotted and rescued people getting into difficulty on ‘toy boat inflatables’ as they have been described when, used in open water situations, they were blown out to sea. Despite all the warnings not to use them on beaches in open water areas, people are still doing so.

    The RNLI’s Water Safety Manager Kevin Rahill discusses the dangers on the MARINE TIMES Podcast this week with Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • NEWS

    Bringing Scrutiny to the Policing of Fishing

    “This brings scrutiny to the policing of fishing in Ireland which is badly needed. It is a good day for fishermen.”

    That was the view expressed by solicitor Dermot Conway, a leading legal figure in the case, when the Supreme Court announced that it was referring the Porcupine Bank Dublin Bay Prawn fishery case to the European Court of Justice.

    Irish Aquaculture Must Be A Priority

    The Programme for Government fails to recognise the significant opportunity for Irish aquaculture in light of the increasing global demand for seafood, more sustainable food sources and carbon efficient food production, according to the Irish Farmers’ Association.

    Read the full article here»

  • News

    Major Fishing Organisations Are Co-Operating Closely

    The major fishing organisations are co-operating closely in dealing with the industry’s future. Hugo Boyle, CEO of the Irish South and East Fish Producer’s Organisation has stressed the importance and value of this, particularly in the context of Brexit and the effects of Covid 19 which continue to be major issues for the industry.

    Baltimore RNLI provides assistance to a motor boat in difficulty

    Baltimore RNLI was called out yesterday evening, Friday 7th August, to provide assistance to a motor boat in difficulty at Sherkin Island, off the coast of west Cork.

    Read the full article here»



Nature’s Untapped Treasure Chest »

Our ocean is often viewed as nature's untapped treasure chest, with marine plants and organisms providing a natural source of medicines, food additives and cosmetics. Globally, the deep ocean has already given us compounds to treat cancer, inflammation and nerve damage and it's an area of research that is still developing, with great potential for the future.

Over the past 60 years, scientists have conducted random harvesting of marine organisms for the discovery of new natural products with unique properties and diverse types of applications. Marine Biodiscovery refers to the process that spans from the exploration of our oceans to the applications of new biomolecules of marine origin.

RNLI respond to report of vessel on fire »

Skerries RNLI and Clogherhead RNLI were tasked on Wednesday night, 5th August following a 999 call to Dublin Coast Guard reporting a possible fire on board a fishing vessel off Laytown beach.

Shortly before 11pm, the volunteer crew from Skerries launched the Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat, while the volunteers in Clogherhead launched their Shannon class all weather lifeboat. The lifeboats reached either end of Laytown beach at approximately the same time and began to search for any vessels in distress. They were soon joined by land based units from Drogheda Coast Guard and Skerries Coast Guard, who made contact with the caller on the beach to gather more information to pass to the lifeboats. Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116 and a local fishing vessel also joined the search efforts.


Some UK Seafood Businesses May Never Open Again »

Seafish UK is carrying out a survey to determine “the financial and socio-economic impact of Covid-19 on the UK’s seafood processing industry. “ During July and August seafood processors are being asked to provide information on how the pandemic has affected their business

Also, the decision by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) to certify the first bluefin tuna fishery with its global standard for sustainable fishing has been challenged. Japanese longline fishery Usufuku Honten’s certification has been given with a requirement for some improvements which the fishery must make as a condition of certification.

Offshore wind is a "Game Changer" for Ireland »

New ambitious targets in the Programme for Government present a turning point for Ireland’s offshore wind industry. The EirWind Blueprint launched, outlines strategic recommendations to inform policymaking, at a vital, formative time for the sector.

The Blueprint is a synthesis of work arising from the EirWind project over a two-year period from August 2018 to July 2020. The research involved 18 researchers and seven academic staff from MaREI, the SFI Research Centre for Energy, Climate and Marine which is hosted by University College Cork and was supported by ten industry partners.


Marine Times - Weekender: Saturday 1st August

August edition in all good shops this week!

News, opinion and comment on the week from the Marine Times, Ireland’s leading maritime publication. Printed edition published monthly. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Podcast

    Allegations of Misconduct 

    “Gardaí are examining allegations of misconduct in public office in relation to investigations into the seafaring tragedies and the implementation of maritime safety regulation to determine if a criminal act has occurred where a criminal investigation should be undertaken.”

    That statement from the Garda Press Office to the Marine Times confirmed what international maritime lawyer, Michael Kingston, said he had received in a letter from Garda Commissioner Drew Harris. Mr.Kingston, whose father Tim, died in the Betelgeuse oil tanker tragedy in Bantry Bay in 1979, has been pursuing complaints against the Department of Transport and the Marine Casualty Investigation Board for several years.

    On THE MARINE TIMES Podcast this week he gives his reaction to the Garda decision to Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • News

    Garda Investigation of Alleged Misconduct in Public Office

    Gardaí are examining allegations of misconduct in public office in relation to investigations into seafaring tragedies and the implementation of maritime safety regulations to determine if a criminal act has occurred where a criminal investigation should be undertaken.

    The Garda Press Office statement confirming an investigation follows Maritime Lawyer Michael Kingston, the leading figure in complaints about the Marine Casualty Board which was held not to be independent of government by the European Court of Justice, making complaints to Garda Headquarters in January.

    Read the full article here»

  • News

    Marliona Incident Still Under Investigation

    The Department of Foreign Affairs has still carrying out an investigation into the incident between the Donegal trawler, Marliona and the British Royal Naval frigate, HMS Lancaster when the trawler was told to leave an area 60miles off Donegal, within the Irish exclusive economic (EEZ) zone.

    Irish - Spanish Lobster Collaboration

    The Marine Institute is collaborating with scientists in Spain as part of a new project, Smart Lobster, to monitor the digging activity and maintenance of burrows of the Nephrops norvegicus, commonly known as the Dublin Bay Prawn, using the EMSO SmartBay Observatory located in Galway Bay.

    Read the full article here»



Safety on the Water website Launched »

Minister of State at the Department of Transport, Hildegarde Naughton TD has launched the newly updated Safety on the Water website. www.safetyonthewater.gov.ie This is a collaboration between the Coast Guard, RNLI, Water Safety Ireland, Irish Sailing and BIM, and incorporates a new Safety on the Water logo.

Speaking at an event hosted by RNLI Galway to formally launch the new initiative today Minister Naughton said; “Water safety is not just a seasonal consideration - it is an all year round commitment and everybody has a role to play, be it as participants, as supervisors of children or simply as observers who can raise the alert”.


Norway Wants Brexit Agreement With Uk »

The Norwegian government has made it clear that the country wants to negotiate a comprehensive free trade agreement with the UK by the end of this year so that it can continue to sell its salmon and whitefish without serious disruption.

Also, the United Nations agency for safety at sea, the International Maritime Organisation, has said that the entry into force of the Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety will be crucial for improved safety at sea for fishermen and will support the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

Smell of the sea may steer seabirds to their food »

Researchers in Ireland have shed some light on how a wide-ranging seabird tracks its prey. They showed how the species known as the Manx Shearwater searches for food in areas of ocean packed with plankton.

These microscopic organisms give off a smell the seabirds can sense – and this may be key for ocean faring species hunting for a moveable feast. The team, who were based at University College Cork for the study, tracked dozens of birds over three years at colonies on High Island and Great Blasket Island off the coast of Galway and Kerry respectively.


Marine Times - Weekender: Saturday 25th July

Print edition back in all good shops NOW!

News, opinion and comment on the week from the Marine Times, Ireland’s leading maritime publication. Printed edition published monthly. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Opinion

    Fishing Voice Is Needed 

    The Minister for the Marine held a “detailed and informative meeting with fishing industry representatives” this week. “I set out the huge ambition in the Programme for Government for building a sustainable fishing sector. The continued ambition for the development of a sustainable fisheries sector is a significant feature of the new Programme for Government. I look forward to working with the sector to delivering on that objective.”

    That was what Minister Dara Calleary said after the meeting with the country’s four fishermen’s producer organisations, the National Inshore Fishermen’s Forum and the Irish Fish Processors and Exporters Association.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Islands Frustrated At Lack Of Progress On Policy Formation

    Comhdháil Olieán na hEireann, the Islands Federation, is frustrated with the lack of progress by the government on the formulation of a policy for the islands.

    “Last-minute consultation, confusion and the inactivity of the Interdepartmental Committee on Islands” are amongst the criticisms.

    “It would be hugely retrograde should the development of an action plan for the islands and the formation of island policies be put on hold indefinitely,” says Rhoda Twombly, Secretary of the Islands’ Federation on this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • News

    Thousands of Illegally Caught Lobsters Seized

    The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) has seized thousands of lobster catches this week, the biggest being 6,000 in a lorry at Rosslare which was destined for Spain. Further investigations are underway as to the origin of these. The SFPA says that it believes some were collected from the North/West as well as from the West and Northern Ireland. According to it “almost 800” of these were “illegally-caught” and returned to the sea alive. They included undersized and V-notched lobsters, which are protected from being caught, having been V-notched and returned to the sea to breed by licensed fishermen.

    Read the full article here»



INFOMAR is laying the foundation »

Ireland through its national seabed mapping programme, INFOMAR has achieved global recognition for its endeavor to systematically map the seabed of its entire marine territory, and to unlock and sustainably manage the associated resources. International partnership and collaboration between governments, industry, and academia have evolved as Ireland influences the roadmap towards better ocean governance, essential for the safety of society, our future food security, our energy, and for positive climate action and adaptation.

The Marine Institute and Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) INFOMAR programme team aim to complete Ireland's seabed mapping by end 2026, potentially being the first country globally to do so. In parallel they are raising the awareness and impact of seabed mapping, and the innovation and technology development opportunities that Ireland can potentially derive from this world leading endeavor.


EU Vessels Landing Even More Fish from UK Waters »

EU fishing vessels have been increasing the amount of fish they catch in UK waters at a much faster rate than the UK’s own boats. Analysis of official landings data carried out for Shetland Fishermen’s Association (SFA) shows that between 2011 and 2018 vessels from the EU27 landed 60% more fish and shellfish from the UK Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) while UK boats landed just 17% more.

Also, the industry in England has united to oppose the Benyon Report - A recent teleconference organised by Defra, was held to discuss the contents of the Benyon Report, by ex-Fisheries Minister Richard Benyon, on Highly Protected Marine Areas. The meeting revealed the strength of feeling across the fishing industry against an attempt to shoehorn No Take Zones into the already established process for designating and managing marine protected areas.

Some Fishermen Ineligible for Tie Up Scheme »

Lack of Sales Notes Leaves Some Fishermen Ineligible for Tie Up Scheme: The COVID-19 Tie-up Scheme which is intended to assist fishermen to voluntarily opt to tie up for one or two of the three months from 1st June to 31st August has been described by fishermen as an abject failure on almost every level.

According to figures released by BIM, who launched the temporary voluntary fleet tie-up, uptake on the scheme has been low, only 104 applications were received for the month of June. Out of those applications only 65 of the applicants were ultimately successful due to the strict criteria being sought from vessel owners for eligibility to the scheme.


Marine Times - Weekender: Saturday 18th July

Print edition back in all good shops NOW!

News, opinion and comment on the week from the Marine Times, Ireland’s leading maritime publication. Printed edition published monthly. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Opinion

    Marine Ignorance 

    Without the marine sector, this island nation would be in great difficulties. It could not export or import all the goods it needs. 95 per cent of Ireland’s exports and imports move by sea.

    The Coalition parties in their plan for government declared: “We are committed to prioritising the development of the marine. As an island nation, Ireland has a special relationship with the ocean.”

    So far, there is no indication of delivery on that commitment. The marine sector remains placed at a low point in the State administrative system.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    “Through Hell and Back Trying to Convince Government”

    “I have been through hell and back trying to explain to the Government that Ireland’s maritime safety framework is broken,” says the lawyer who, for several years has been seeking changes in the operations of the Maritime Casualty Investigation Board.

    Following the decision by the European Court of Justice that the Board is not independent, due to the presence of two civil servants on its board, Michael Kingston talks to Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, on this week’s Marine Times Podcast.

    “The Government should stop wasting money seeking legal advice about the European Court of Justice decision that the Board is not independent and get on with the job of re-organising it,” he says.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • News

    Another Marine Minister

    Two Government Ministers whose responsibility included the Marine have been appointed in just over a fortnight. Barry Cowen, who had told the fishing industry not to be concerned that he was from an inland county, was sacked and replaced by Dara Calleary who is from a coastal county, Mayo.

    Marine Casualty Board Is Not Independent

    The European Court of Justice has ruled that the Marine Casualty Investigation Board is not independent of Government due to the presence on its board of two civil servants. These are the Secretary-General of the Department of Transport (or deputed Depurty), under which it operates and the Chief Surveyor in the Marine Survey Office of the Department, Brian Hogan.

    Read the full article here»



News Roundup for the Week »

Irish aquaculture businesses have 'a high level of compliance with statutory requirements,” according to the Marine Institute's fish health inspection.

Also in our roundup: The Naval Service Vessel LÉ William Butler Yeats detained a German-registered fishing vessel approximately 250 nautical miles north-west of Malin Head on Friday morning. The detention was “in relation to alleged breaches of fishing regulations,” according to the Defence Forces Press Office; and Baltimore RNLI were called out to provide a medical evacuation late Thursday night, 16th July from Sherkin Island off the coast of Baltimore, West Cork. The volunteer lifeboat crew, under Coxswain Kieran Cotter, launched their all-weather lifeboat at 11.50pm, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to provide medical assistance and evacuation to a boy who had sustained an injury earlier that day. And, RNLI Volunteer Peter Byrne participated in his first callout as Wicklow all-weather lifeboat launched shortly after 10:05pm on Wednesday night (15 July), after a member of the public reported seeing a wind surfer having problems getting ashore near Brittas Bay beach as darkness fell.


Turn The Tide On FISHING Industry’s Safety Record »

Latest figures show fishing fatality rate is still one of the highest in the UK compared to other industries. A new campaign is urging fishing crews in the UK to get back to port safely. The campaign, led by The Fishing Industry Safety Group (FISG), highlights a day at sea and the simple steps a skipper and his crew take every day to ensure they return home safely to their loved ones.

The campaign comes as many fishing crews across the UK are returning to sea following weeks of lockdown and challenging market conditions to sell their catch. Created with support from the fishing industry, it focuses on the importance of community and home for those who make a living from catching fish. It shines a light on the pride and professionalism of the industry as a way to get vital out messages about good safety at sea.

Shellfish toxicity - Warning advice remains »

The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) and the Marine Institute are reminding the public to refrain from recreational gathering of shellfish in all bays and coastline in the Southwest region, particularly in the Castlemaine Harbour for the coming weeks due to the presence of toxins, which can cause illness when contaminated shellfish are consumed.

The presence of shellfish toxins are common in summer months and is due to certain microscopic phytoplankton species, upon which shellfish filter feed. The toxins detected at the present time are high levels of Diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) which can result in a temporary gastroenteritis-like illness and a less common but more serious Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP). Neither toxin is removed by cooking, but they do eventually decrease to safe levels naturally in the live shellfish over time.


Marine Times - Weekender: Saturday 11th July

Print edition back in all good shops NOW!

News, opinion and comment on the week from the Marine Times, Ireland’s leading maritime publication. Printed edition published monthly. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Opinion

    “Sending Britain Down A Road to Nowhere” 

    There is increasing concern about the outcome of the Brexit negotiations and the impact upon the Irish industry should current access to UK waters be restricted. This weekend we report that the UK Fisheries Bill has passed all stages in the House of Lords and has gone to the House of Commons for finalising. We also report that UK fishing organisations have united to press their politicians to deliver on the promise of leaving the Common Fisheries Policy.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    “There Are Very Few People Not Interested In The Marine Area”

    Ireland’s National Aquarium is involved in a series of projects to widen appreciation and understanding of the maritime sector. Dr. Nóirín Burke, Director of Education at Galway Atlantiquaria, says “there are very few people who are not interested in the marine area.”

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • News

    Leaving Behind The Outdated Common Fisheries Policy

    While Irish fishing organisations are worried about the possibility of a ‘No Deal Brexit’ and its effects, the first major piece of British fisheries legislation in nearly forty years has passed the House of Lords and gone to the House of Commons. The ‘Fisheries Bill’ creates the power for the UK to operate as an independent coastal state and manage its fish stocks outside the EU. It passed its Third Reading in the House of Lords last week and is now in the House of Commons for its First Reading. It is intended to end current automatic rights for EU vessels to fish in British waters.

    Read the full article here»



Ocean observations and forecasting in Ireland’s seas »

The Marine Institute uses ocean observation systems and marine research infrastructure to observe and understand how our ocean is changing, and the data collected is used to model and project the impacts of our changing oceans.

Dr Glenn Nolan, Oceanographic and Climate Services Section Manager at the Marine Institute said, "We work with local, national and European partners to develop and enhance integrated ocean and climate observation monitoring programmes. Ireland is uniquely positioned to be at the forefront of efforts to better understand global ocean challenges and to provide essential national services in observing our changing ocean and climate." The Marine Institute operates many platforms at sea and around the coast to understand the current state of the ocean around Ireland.

News Roundup for the Week »

A number of applications for assistance under the Covid temporary tie-up scheme were rejected because sales notes were not submitted to the SFPA, it has been learned. These notes were necessary to confirm that vessels were in excess of at least €5,000 worth of activity last year.

Also in our roundup: Malin Head fishermen in County Donegal continued to V-notch berried female lobsters, maintaining a conservation measure at their own expense, after it was suspended by Bord Iascaigh Mhara this year and; Cape Clear Island Distillery which commenced operations only last November was extremely hard hit by the collapse in the pub, hotel and duty free trades, Séamus Ó Drisceoil tells the Marine Times from the Co. Cork island. “Showing innovation and agility in the face of a collapse in business, we decided to do something completely different by becoming the first and only distillery in Ireland to offer award-winning gin in engraved and personalized bottles.”


KOREA NEEDS SUBSTANTIAL FISH REFORMS SAY NGO's »

Crews on 29 of 40 Korean fishing vessels investigated by two non-governmental organisations (NGOs) alleged violent attacks were made upon them and that their vessels were engaged in illegal activities, including intentionally targeting marine mammals.

Also, Extensive new protections are being put in place as part of an updated plan to look after New Zealand’s native Hector’s and Maui dolphins, announced Minister of Fisheries Stuart Nash and Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. “Hector’s dolphins are nationally vulnerable with about 15,000 in New Zealand’s waters. Maui dolphins are critically endangered, with only about 63 left. These precious marine mammals are New Zealand’s taonga and we need to act now to ensure they are there for future generations,” said Eugenie Sage.


Marine Times - Weekender: Saturday 4th July

Print edition back in all good shops NOW!

News, opinion and comment on the week from the Marine Times, Ireland’s leading maritime publication. Printed edition published monthly. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES here on marinetimes.ie

  • Editorial

    It's .... AND MARINE! 

    The new Marine Minister has said that the fishing and maritime community should not feel concerned because he is from a landlocked county. 52-year-old Barry Cowen from Clara in County Offaly was responding to mixed reaction from the marine sector to his appointment. He is brother of former Taoiseach Brian Cowen, after whose retirement from the Dáil he was elected. An auctioneer and valuer by profession, he was Fianna Fail spokesman on Public Expenditure and Reform in the last Dáil.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Where Better To Explore Than A Coastline Near You?

    There could be at least one very positive benefit from Covid 19 and that is the level of interest being taken in Nature by the Irish population. That could particularly benefit the marine sphere, says our guest on this week’s MARINE TIMES PODCAST, Dr. Simon Berrow who is Chief Executive of the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group and a columnist with the Marine Times.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Penalty Points ... Again!

    The EU Commission has decided to send a reasoned opinion to Ireland over its failure to fulfil its obligations under Council Regulation (EC) No 1224/2009 (also ‘'Control Regulation'') establishing a Community control systemfor ensuring compliance with the rules of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

    Read the full article here»



Coastal communities share how important the Ocean is to their communities »

Coastal Communities are the focus on the Marine Institute's Oceans of Learning series. The Marine Institute and partners are celebrating our world's shared ocean and our connection to the sea in a 10-week series, sharing news and offering online interactive activities, videos and downloadable resources on a new marine topic each week.

A series of watercolour illustrations and interviews have captured the importance of the ocean to coastal communities in Ireland and Wales as part of BlueFish, an EU-funded project. Through engaging with coastal communities using art, BlueFish links knowledge and understanding of the marine resources and the potential impacts of climate change on the Irish and Celtic Sea ecosystem.

News Roundup for the Week »

Fifteen aquaculture companies in seven counties – Galway, Donegal, Slio, Kerry, Waterford, Mayo and Cork are undertaking expansion with a total investment of over €3m., with the Department of Marine through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Programme providing grants of €1.2m.

Also in our roundup: Routine shellfish monitoring by the Marine Institute along South West and West coasts has detected increased levels of naturally occurring toxins compounds in recent weeks. Such levels are common at this time of the year and are due to microscopic phytoplankton species blooming in coastal waters during the warmer and longer days of summer, the institute says.


international news »

A new supply chain led initiative, focused on driving improvements to the management of the North East Atlantic fisheries for mackerel, herring and blue whiting has been established. The formal creation of the group is the latest step in a project which began in 2019 in response to the suspension of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) North East Atlantic mackerel fishery certification.

Also, over the past year work has been underway to develop a project to reduce marine litter at Northern Ireland’s largest fishing ports. The Marine Litter Management project was born from a meeting of the Northern Ireland Fishermen’s Safety Forum. At a meeting last year members agreed that action was needed to address litter in the ports


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 26th June

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES publishes this WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Government Discrimination! 

    As the MARINE TIMES returns to printed publication after three months of enforced suspension due to Covid 19 it is necessary, as Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper, to highlight State discrimination against the fishing industry and the aquaculture sector.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Achill Oysters Urge Restaurants to Source Irish Seafood to Aid Recovery From Covid-19

    Five generations of O’Malley’s have made a living from the sea in Achill. Hugh O’Malley, owner of Achill Oysters, producing Irish rock oysters for the domestic and international market, has urged restaurants to include local oysters and seafood on their menus to help offset the economic impact of COVID-19. He talks to Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, on this week’s Podcast about the importance of bringing Irish aquaculture to the attention of the public.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Irreparable Damage on Coastal Communities

    The country’s four fish producer organisations have made another joint appeal to Minister for the Marine Michael Creed and his Department to meet them to discuss an improved system of help to the industry to overcome the impact of Covid 19.

    Read the full article here»



Go Domhain san Fhuil (Deep in the Blood) »

A day in the life of the few remaining boats that fish out of Magheraroarty in the Donegal Gaeltacht. Fishing is an inter-generational activity in many Gaeltacht communities, including Magheraroarty in West Donegal.

It's a small horseshoe shaped bay, with a stone pier facing out towards Inis Bó Finne, a small island with a strong link to the mainland. Go Domhain san Fhuil is a 2 part series for BBC Gaeilge featuring three of the few remaining boats that fish out of Machaire Rabhartaigh in the Donegal Gaeltacht.

News Roundup for the Week »

The British Government is said to have become “extremely intransigent” in Brexit negotiations, opposing the linking of fisheries to a trade deal. Malin Head fishermen have continued to V-notch berried female lobsters implementing a conservation measure at their own expense.

Also in our roundup: The entire Killala Unit of the Coast Guard in County Mayo has been “stood down”. Personnel issues have also been reported in the past few weeks in Units at Dunmore East in County Waterford and Crosshaven in County Cork. The Killala Unit covered a wide coastline area in North Mayo.


international news »

Europêche is challenging the EU Commission’s new biodiversity strategy. “It wants to ban fishing in 10% of waters and limit activity in 30%, as well as a ban on bottom trawling,” according to Javier Garat, President of European industry’s representative organisation.

Fish scales, normally a by-product of food preparation, can be used to make electronic devices and food bags. Research work is successfully developing these uses rather than disposal of the scales. And in the USA, the American Chemical Society has revealed details of research work which has shown how fish scales can be used instead of plastic to make electronic devices more environmentally friendly.

‘Sea how to Draw’ classes online »

The Marine Institute Explorers Education Programme is delighted to launch its Explorers SEA how to Draw series, providing up to fourteen online drawing classes, delivered by popular cartoonist and author Dr John Joyce over the summer months.

Dr Paul Connolly, CEO of the Marine Institute welcomed the Explorers initiative and collaboration with John Joyce. “As the Marine Institute’s former communications manager, John has always been a strong advocate of the Explorers Education programme, raising awareness and engagement about our connection with the ocean. His cartoon drawings have engaged people of all ages and the humorous representations of scientists, marine animals, research ships and equipment continue to provide an engaging way to connect with scientists, researchers and the wider community at large.”


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 19th June

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES publishes this WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    How Can This Be Fair Treatment? 

    The MARINE TIMES takes pride in its claim to be Ireland’s leading maritime newspaper, in which role we seek to reflect the opinions of the fishing industry, the coastal communities and the maritime sector. There are times in marine journalism when we come across issues which we find difficult to understand.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Fishing Industry Treated Disgracefully by Government

    On this week’s Podcast Hugo Boyle, Chief Executive of the Irish South and East Fish Producers’ Organisation responds to the Government’s allocation of €50m. to Ireland’s beef farmers and €25m. to the Arts and Culture section, but a miserable allocation of funding to fishermen for Covid 19 assistance, which he describes as “a disgrace”.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    UK Gets More Intransigent About Brexit

    The UK are being extremely intransigent in the negotiations with the EU about Brexit as they increased opposition to linking a fisheries agreement about access to their waters with trade deal between Britain and the EU. Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation Chief Executive, Sean O’Donoghue, told the Marine Times this week that this has become very clear.

    Read the full article here»



Explore Ireland’s Coastal Communities in Oceans of Learning series »

In Ireland, 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast and many communities along the Irish coast depend on industries such as tourism, fishing and aquaculture. Furthermore, there is now mounting evidence that the ocean plays a key role in the general wellbeing of our coastal communities.

This week’s Oceans of Learning series will explore the importance of Ireland’s Coastal Communities, with resources from the Marine Institute, Commissioners of Irish Lights, Údarás na Gaeltachta, Galway City Museum and the Explorers Education Programme. Over 10 weeks, the Marine Institute and partners are celebrating our world’s shared ocean and our connection to the sea in our Oceans of Learning series, sharing news and offering online interactive activities, videos and downloadable resources on a new marine topic each week.


UPDATE on NEXT edition of the marine times »

In late March we made the difficult decision to postpone printing of the Marine Times Newspaper during the Covid-19 restrictions. We truly appreciate everyones understanding and support of our decision.

THE GOOD NEWS is we are now planning a return to the shops around this great Island Nation and work is now complete on our next issue which will be in shops later this week.    

Thank you for your continued support - Mark Mc Carthy, Editor


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 12th June

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES publishes this WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Little To Be Encouraged About In FF and FG Approach to Marine 

    The Chief Executive of ISME, the Irish independent representative association for Small and Medium Enterprises, told the Dáil Committee on Covid 19 this week how difficult it is to deal with the “upper reaches of the public service and executive.” There are many in the fishing industry who will find agreement with that opinion from their own experience.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Aquaculture Not Understood

    On this week’s Podcast the very difficult situation in which the aquaculture sector has been placed because of Covid 19 and the lack of immediate support from the State to assist the country’s fish farmers is outlined by the IFA’s Aquaculture Executive, Teresa Morrissey. She tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, that there is a lack of understanding of what the sector is facing. Without an immediate response, there is a strong possibility of long-term damage, with the shellfish sector likely to be particularly impacted. The IFA has offered a number of proposals for assistance to the Department of the Marine and BIM, without positive response so far.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    State Has Not Offered Assistance To Aquaculture Sector

    There is a general lack of understanding of the aquaculture sector, according to the IFA’s Aquaculture Executive who has warned that urgent action is needed by the government to deal with the impact on the sector caused by the Covid 19 crisis. After several discussions with the Department of the Marine and Bord Iascaigh Mhara, no formal assistance has been offered from the State, “If the situation is not addressed urgently, there will be an even bigger and more difficult position to face, particularly in the shellfish sector,” according to Teresa Morrissey, IFA Aquaculture Executive

    Read the full article here»



New book Surviving the Storms showcases incredible rescue by Irish lifeboat crews »

A new book providing a collection of first-hand accounts of some of the most dramatic rescues carried out by RNLI lifesavers around Ireland and the UK over the past 20 years, features an incredible feat of bravery by a Cork lifeboat crew and an incredible feat of bravery by Portrush man and former RNLI station mechanic, Anthony Chambers.

Told in the words of Castletownbere RNLI Coxswain Dean Hegarty, it provides a first-hand account of the dramatic rescue of a fishing crew in storm force conditions after their vessel lost all power at the harbour entrance of Castletownbere in West Cork. Six lives were saved that night and the Coxswain is set to receive a medal for gallantry, and the crew and launching authority, letters of thanks from the Institution. The book Surviving the Storms is on sale now with royalties from all sales supporting the lifesaving charity.

News Roundup for the Week »

The Minister for the Marine has announced €3.5 million in new investment by six seafood processing companies, with his Department’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Programme providing grants of €1,081,192. The grants are co-funded by the Government and the European Union.

Also in our roundup: The UK has been accused of trying to “cherry pick” what it wants to achieve from the Brexit negotiations with the EU. Fisheries appears to be included in this approach where it wants a separate deal from any general trade agreement. This week the EU's Brexit lead negotiator Michel Barnier said he will “not allow cherry picking" by the UK in the talks between the two sides on a future trade deal.


international news »

In Scotland, a new package worth up to £2 million, aimed at helping the industry during the coronavirus (COVID-19), means that Scottish vessels will be able to diversify into new markets and access additional fish quotas around the North Sea and west coast of Scotland.

Also, According to reports in the USA President Donald Trump has announced that he will open up a 5,000 square mile conservation area in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of New England to commercial fishing. The move allows commercial fishing to resume in the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, a sanctuary created in 2016 during the Obama administration. It also cancels a planned phase out of red crab and lobster fisheries in the area.

UPDATE on NEXT edition of the marine times »

In late March we made the difficult decision to postpone printing of the Marine Times Newspaper during the Covid-19 restrictions. We truly appreciate everyones understanding and support of our decision.

THE GOOD NEWS is we are now planning a return to the shops around this great Island Nation and are starting work on our next issue which will be in shops from later in the month and you can now pre-order a copy to be sent directly to your door for just €3.60 inc p&p.

Thank you for your continued support - Mark Mc Carthy, Editor


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 5th June

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES publishes this WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Will the EU Stand By the Irish Fishing Industry? 

    An agreement for continued fishing access to UK waters is vital for the Irish industry. That has been declared a priority by the Government in the Brexit negotiations. Mackerel and Prawns are particularly important for the Irish fleet, with estimates that as much as 40 per cent of Irish catches of these species come from what would be regarded as British waters.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Kevin Flannery

    'Fishermen must be involved in development of Marine Protected Areas'

    Kevin Flannery has been involved in the maritime world for over 50 years and is one of its most respected and authoritative voices. He is our guest on this week’s Podcast where he talks about the impending development of Marine Protected Areas and stresses the importance of including fishermen in consultation and development of them.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Will There Be A Fisheries Brexit Deal?

    “The fisheries element of the Brexit negotiations is going to get very difficult,” the Tanaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs, Simon Coveney, admitted in the Dáil this week. He was responding to increasing concern that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is attempting to exclude fisheries from any trade deal with the European Union. This was raised by Pearse Doherty, Deputy Leader of Sinn Fein and Brendan Howlin, former Labour Party Leader.

    Read the full article here»



Latest Updates on Covid-19 Tie-Up Scheme »

65 of 104 Tie-Up Applications Approved; Producer Organisations Get No Further Response from Marine Minister; Tie-Up Funding Won’t Even Cover Insurance Payments

A total of 104 applications were received for the Temporary Fleet Tie-up Scheme for the month of June. Bord Iascaigh Mhara, which is administering the scheme says that 9 did not fully complete their applications, 5 missed the closing date, but have been offered an alternative tie-up month, 25 were closed and so 67 applicants were initially approved to tie-up in the month of June. However, two of those approved applicants did not hand in their sea fishing licences as required under the conditions of the scheme, so only 65 have been finally approved.

News Roundup for the Week »

The Sea Fisheries Protection Authority has warned that there must be compliance with EU regulations by those engaged in “recreational fishing” during the Summer. This comes after the re-opening of the crab and lobster fishery for “recreational fishers” at the start of May. There is a particular warning that taking small crabs out of the population damages future breeding potential.

Also in our roundup we feature Carr & Sons Seafood Ltd., of Killala, County Mayo, who have acquired the Dublin company, HJ Nolan, whose products will be produced in Mayo. Both are now part of the Swedish Mondi Group which took over Carr six years ago.

Also Northern Ireland Fisheries Minister Edwin Poots MLA has announced a stg£360,000 emergency support package for the region’s aquaculture sector.


international news »

The European Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries, Virginijus Sinkevicius, has announced that the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) is to be increased by €500 million.

“The additional funding is part of the EU Recovery Package and follows earlier support measures to alleviate the immediate socio-economic impact on the sector,” the Commissioner said, announcing that the Commission will work closely with EU countries “to ensure that the additional funding contributes to a swift recovery, in line with the European Green Deal and the ambitions of the Common Fisheries Policy.”

He said that, for many coastal communities, who strongly rely on fisheries for their livelihoods, the social-economic impact of the coronavirus crisis was – and still is – dramatic.

UPDATE on NEXT edition of the marine times »

In late March we made the difficult decision to postpone printing of the Marine Times Newspaper during the Covid-19 restrictions. We truly appreciate everyones understanding and support of our decision.

THE GOOD NEWS is we are now planning a return to the shops around this great Island Nation and are starting work on our next issue which will be in shops from later in the month and you can now pre-order a copy to be sent directly to your door for just €3.60 inc p&p.

Thank you for your continued support - Mark Mc Carthy, Editor


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 29th May

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES publishes this WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Minister Need Not Have Bothered 

    Marine Minister Michael Creed sent a long, detailed letter, to the country’s four fish producer organisations after they accused him and his Department last week of turning their backs on the industry. It was an explanation of why he had rejected the joint proposal put forward by the producers for a scheme of assistance to the fishing industry in the current crisis caused by the Covid 19 pandemic. Their proposal was an alternative to his Department’s temporary tie-up scheme.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    The guest interviewee on our Podcast this week is Hugo Boyle, Chief Executive Officer of the South and East Fish Producers’ Organisation. He talks to Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, about the current situation of the industry for his members, following the rejection by Marine Minister Michael Creed of the proposal by the country’s four fish producer organisations for assistance to the industry to deal with the problems of the Covid 19 Pandemic.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    104 Applications For Department’s Scheme

    One hundred and four applications were made to the Department of the Marine’s Temporary Fleet Tie-up Scheme by the time the first closing date for applications closed on Wednesday. Bord Iascaigh Mhara, responsible for administering the scheme on behalf of the Minister, said that 104 applications had been received for inclusion in the scheme for the month of June. Applications for July and August will be accepted until June 20 and July 20 respectively.

    Read the full article here»



UPDATE on NEXT edition of the marine times »

In late March we made the difficult decision to postpone printing of the Marine Times Newspaper during the Covid-19 restrictions. We truly appreciate everyones understanding and support of our decision.

THE GOOD NEWS is we are now planning a return to the shops around this great Island Nation and are starting work on our next issue which will be in shops from later in the month and you can now pre-order a copy to be sent directly to your door for just €3.60 inc p&p.

Thank you for your continued support - Mark Mc Carthy, Editor

government need to finally act on the urgent appeals from our fishing communities in crisis »

The government need to finally act on the urgent appeals from our fishing communities in crisis according to Pádraig Mac Lochlainn TD. Minister’s scheme labeled “useless” and “not fit for purpose” by the Irish fishing industry

The Donegal Sinn Féin TD, has again called on the Minister for the Marine, Michael Creed to work with his government colleagues to deliver the financial supports needed to “bail out our coastal fishing communities in this unprecedented crisis”. Deputy Mac Lochlainn was speaking following the issuing of press releases by all of the fish producer organisations, appealing to the Minister to “meet them half way” and deliver the financial supports needed.


Oceans of Learning focuses on Food From Our Ocean »

Exploring the science behind our seafood with 'Food from our Ocean' is the first topic in the Marine Institute's Oceans of Learning series. The Marine Institute and partners are celebrating our world's shared ocean and our connection to the sea through an Oceans of Learning series, sharing news and offering online interactive activities, videos and downloadable resources on a new marine topic each week.

Oceans serve as the world's largest source of protein, with more than 3 billion people depending on the oceans as their primary source of protein. With the United Nations anticipating the global population to grow to 9.8 billion by 2050, seafood has a critically important role to play in global food security and nutrition for our growing population.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS »

New Zealand Protection for Sea Birds

Better protection for seabirds is being put in place with a new National Plan of Action to reduce fishing-related captures, New Zealand Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage announced recently. The National Plan of Action for Seabirds 2020 outlines our commitment to reduce fishing-related captures and associated seabird deaths. The new plan follows wide public consultation launched in November last year. “The plan focuses on innovative solutions and education to reduce seabird bycatch. It seeks to ensure fishing operators know how to avoid catching seabirds and take the appropriate steps to do so,” said Stuart Nash.


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 22nd May

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Minister Creed and His Department Do Not Appreciate the Importance of the Fishing Industry 

    “I’ve never witnessed anger like it in the sector.”

    That was a strong and blunt comment by the Chief Executive of the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, Sean O’Donoghue when Ireland’s four major fish producer organisations told the Minister for the Marine and his Department officials that the fishing industry now felt they had turned their backs on the industry. It has not often enough that these four organisations have been so unified. It is good for the industry that they are. Their vehemence in condemnation of Minister Creed and his Departmental advisors reflects the strong feeling in the industry that it is being neglected.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcasts

    Sean O’Donoghue, CEO, Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, tells Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, why Ireland’s four major fishing industry organisations have accused Marine Minister Michael Creed and his officials officials of ‘turning their backs’ on the fishing industry.

    Listen to the podcast here»

    Teresa Morrissey, IFA Aquaculture Executive, says that they are waiting for a response from the Department of the Marine to proposals which IFA has made for assistance to the aquaculture sector. She tells the Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney, that the shellfish sector, in particular, needs an urgent decision.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Ireland’s Producer Organisations Accuse Minister Creed And His Officials Officials Of ‘Turning Their Backs’ On The Fishing Industry

    The country’s four fish producer organisations have made a unified criticism of the Marine Minister and his Department who they accuse of “turning their backs” on the fishing industry. The Irish Fish Producers’ Organisation (IFPO), the Irish South and East Fish Producers (ISEFPO), the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation (ISWFPO) and the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation (KFO) have joined forces to issue what a blunt, direct condemnation of Minister Michael Creed and his officials.

    Read the full article here»



UPDATE on NEXT edition of the marine times »

In late March we made the difficult decision to postpone printing of the Marine Times Newspaper during the Covid-19 restrictions. We truly appreciate everyones understanding and support of our decision.

We have been providing this weekly news update with podcasts throughout the pandemic situation and will continue to do so freely for our coastal family.

THE GOOD NEWS is we are now planning a return to the shops around this great Island Nation and are starting work on our June issue which will be in shops from mid-June.

Thank you for your continued support - Mark Mc Carthy, Editor

News roundup »

Domestic Coastal And Marine Could Help “Reboot” Tourism Sector

A survey report from NUI Galway says that “marine active” holidaymakers would be a major area to develop to support a revival of the tourist industry after Covid 19. This is mainly because marine-focussed visitors tend to stay longer and spend more than the average visitor in the areas they go to, according to NUIG’s Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU). Total expenditure by domestic tourists in coastal areas was estimated to be €698 million in 2018, which represents 35% of the total expenditure by domestic tourists that year, the study says.


AQUACULTURE SECTOR AND PARTICULARLY SHELLFISH NEEDS URGENT SUPPORT DECISION »

IFA Aquaculture has sent proposals to the Department of the Marine about supports which the sector is seeking. These follow meetings the IFA has held with the Department. A response to the proposals is awaited.

Support is particularly needed by the shellfish and processing sector, according to the IFA’s Aquaculture Executive, Teresa Morrissey. The finfish sector is “operating pretty well, considering all the constraints around the sector,” she told the MARINE TIMES. The shellfish sector is, however, in a more immediate situation, with a lot of overstocking due to problems caused in the markets by the Covid 19 Pandemic.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS »

Big-brained minnows of tomorrow could face cognitive challenges in warmer waters

Climate change could leave freshwater fish with bigger brains but a reduced ability to effectively explore their surroundings, scientists have found. In order to survive, the world’s aquatic life will need to adapt to the warmer waters which global heating will produce in the coming decades. New research by University of Glasgow biologists suggests that the physiological changes fish will undergo in warmer rivers might require them to trade brains for brawn, with potentially challenging consequences.


COVID-19 TEMPORARY TIE-UP SCHEME OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS

Full details here

Following the recent announcement by the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed, T.D, Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s seafood development agency, has today (Tuesday, 19th May, 2020) launched a temporary voluntary fleet tie-up scheme designed to assist in adjusting the supply of fish coming onto a market that is currently depressed due to the COVID-19 pandemic and protect quota availability for later in the year. The Scheme will be implemented under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Operational Programme 2014-20, co-funded by the Government of Ireland and the European Commission.

Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 15th May

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    When Will The Nation Wake-Up To The Importance Of The Fishing Industry? 

    The arrest of another non/Irish fishing boat in the past week off West Cork for alleged breaches of the fisheries regulations and the pictures posted on social media at the weekend of 13 lorries lined up at Castletownbere to load catches from French and Spanish boats landing there, to be taken out of Ireland without benefit to the Irish economy, underlines again the tragedy of political and economic neglect of the vast potential in Irish fishing waters.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcast

    Leading The World In Aquaculture

    Ireland is at the forefront of aquaculture where it has made world-leading advances. The industry is vital to the country and to seafood supplies. That is the view of this week’s interviewee on the Marine Times Podcast - Richard Donnelly, Development and Innovation Manager at Bord Iascaigh Mhara, the national seafood development agency.

    “When you look at aquaculture and you think of being innovative, be it in finance, be it in technology, you can go – yes, the brain power is in Ireland and so we’re just harnessing our brain power."

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Making Ireland The ‘Silicon’ Valley For Aquaculture Innovation

    Bord Iascaigh Mhara is searching for entrepreneurs who can make a major impact on Ireland’s aquaculture sector. The aim, according to Richard Donnelly, the national seafood agency’s Development and Innovation Manager, is to make Ireland “the silicon valley for aquaculture innovation.”

    Read the full article here»



unique data from the bottom of the Atlantic »

Unique ocean-bottom recordings of North Atlantic earthquakes and the songs of great baleen whales offshore Ireland have been obtained thanks to one of the boldest deep-ocean research projects ever undertaken in Europe.

The SEA-SEIS project, led by scientists from the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS), deployed a network of state-of-the-art ocean bottom seismometers across the Irish offshore area, to the west of Ireland, in 2018.

News roundup »

Navy Detains Fifth Vessel For Alleged Fisheries Offences

The Naval Service has detained five fishing boats so far this year for alleged breaches of fishing regulations. The fifth was French-registered and arrested 120 nautical miles south-west of Mizen Head off the West Cork coastline. It was escorted to Castletownbere to be turned over to Gardai for further action.


Nurturing Green Shoots in the Irish Sea »

We are in tough times lads and some realistic news getting into the system on the difficulties which are being experienced in the Markets.

Dr Ronán Cosgrove, Fisheries Conservation Manager, BIM reports: As the Irish Fishing Industry continues to deal with ¬the fall-out from the Covid-19 crisis, its essential that landings are tailored to available markets, and catches are optimised to make best use of available resources. While Nephrops exports remain hampered due to the Italian market collapse, sales of demersal fish species are faring slightly better. As Industry reliance on such species increases, it is imperative that unwanted catches - formerly known as discards - are minimised to boost fish stock sustainability and to maximise economic returns on available quotas.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS »

Scientists successfully develop heat resistant coral to fight bleaching

A team of scientists has successfully produced in a laboratory setting a coral that is more resistant to increased seawater temperatures. The team included researchers from CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the University of Melbourne. Corals with increased heat tolerance have the potential to reduce the impact of reef bleaching from marine heat waves, which are becoming more common under climate change.


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 8th May

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    The Industry Strikes Back 

    There is a considerable level of anger within the fishing industry over Irish national media coverage which described Ireland as heavily overfishing, based on questionable analysis by a British research group that has a strong environmental background. The analysis has also been contradicted by the EU Maritime Directorate. Too often, the fishing industry has suffered such unwarranted criticism and not sufficiently hit back. This time it is different and the industry has struck back strongly, describing aspects of the media coverage as “unfair” and “poor journalism”.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcast

    Fishermen Are Fed Up With Negative Media Coverage

    “Fishermen want to stay fishing, they want to protect the stocks. If they go out of business because the stocks are destroyed, the millions and millions of Euros that they have invested in their business goes nowhere, it’s gone and fishermen are fed up risking their lives to catch fish and to come back into shore to be met with this negative media attention that is just not correct.” So says the Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation, Patrick Murphy.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Fishing Industry Challenges Overfishing Reports

    The Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation and the Irish South and West Fish Producers have contradicted allegations made by the UK ‘think tank,’ the New Economics Foundation which claimed that it had analysed catches fish catches for a 20-year period and that Ireland was amongst five nations which was one of the ‘top five EU States’ which, it alleged, were overfishing.

    Read the full article here»



online learning for Skipper Training Programme »

The Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) National Fisheries College of Ireland in Castletownbere, Co. Cork is piloting the Skipper Full Certificate of Competency as an online course, commencing this week (6th May 2020).

The Skipper Full Programme will be conducted as a nine-week online course, followed by three weeks in situ in Castletownbere once the college can open for the new academic term in accordance with covid restrictions. This is a popular full-time course, designed for fishermen with a Second-Hand Full Certificate of Competency, and 12 months sea time in that capacity, who wish to gain further qualifications in skippering a vessel.

News roundup »

Concern about Spanish vessel at Castletownbere

The skipper and eight of the crew of the ‘Notre Dame Cedeira’, which docked in Castletownbere on April 21 have tested positive for COVID-19, according to media reports in Spain.

Six of the crew of the 33-metre longliner were not infected when given hospital tests. The skipper wanted to remain on the vessel to avoid infecting his family, but was told he had to quarantine elsewhere and is in a local hotel, according to the reports.


Art Kavanagh: 'Let’s Buy Irish Fish' »

We are in tough times lads and some realistic news getting into the system on the difficulties which are being experienced in the Markets.

Apparently some Fresh Fish getting away but the Quasi Embargo being attempted by the French Fishermen is disturbing on many fronts but I suppose it does show the power than can exert by sticking together. I would like to think that the EU may tap them on the shoulder ……. At times like this it is important to make every bullet count and waste no money in landing fish without having some indication that it can be sold.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS »

Inland fisheries are being over looked

That is the view of a report published in ‘Nature Sustainability’ which says that managing freshwater systems to protect inland fish and fisheries will produce substantial co-benefits to people and meet the United Nation’s (UN) Sustainable Development Goals Dr. Sui Phang, Research Fellow at the University of Portsmouth, UK, on of the report’s authors said that Inland fisheries “are frequently undervalued or ignored compared with other sectors, such as agriculture, drinking water, power, sanitation, transportation and marine fisheries.


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 1st May

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Will the EU Control the French – You Want To Bet?

    Today the MARINE TIMES reveals how sectors of the French fishing industry are intimidating French wholesalers and retailers who import and sell Irish fish, in an attempt to prevent them doing so. This is typical of the actions of sectors of the French industry and is highlighted in our Podcast this week where the Managing Director of the Castletownbere Fishermen’s Co-operative, John Nolan, says: “They like to declare European waters when they have 50 per cent of the monkfish quota which they fish in Irish waters, while Ireland has just 5 per cent of the quota in these, its own waters, but they don’t like it when there is a European market which should have equal access.”

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcast

    French Intimidation and Boycott is Wrong!

    As you’ll have read in our Editorial this week, there are sectors of the French fishing industry attempting to boycott and intimidate the sale of non/French caught fish in France. This is typical of the French industry when it ignores EU regulations and, as John Nolan, Managing Director of the Castletownbere Fishermen’s Co-operative points out in this week’s Podcast, he is deeply disappointed by their attitude.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Foreign Landings Nearly Three Times That Of Irish Boats

    It was revealed this week that Non/Irish fishing vessels landed 22,900 tonnes of fish at Castletownbere last year, for a total value of €95 million. Irish vessels landed 11,700 tonnes for a total value of €35m. Those figures, issued by the State fisheries agency, Bord Iascaigh Mhara, show how the Irish fishing industry suffers from the EU Common Fisheries Policy which heavily limits the Irish fleet.

    Read the full article here»



IRELAND’S SEAFOOD SECTOR IS RESILIENT »

The estimated GDP of the Irish seafood sector is €1.22 billion.

There are 16,150 people employed, directly and indirectly, in the sector in Ireland which “remained resilient” last year. According to Bord Iascaigh Mhara in its published ‘Snapshot of Ireland’s Seafood Sector’ for 2019 it “weathered the wide global economic challenges of Brexit and volatility in world trade markets.”

International News »

UK Government Scheme Criticised

The National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations (NFFO) has criticised a government support package to protect English businesses from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, stating that the three-month scheme “could not be described as generous.”


Fish producer organisations MEET WITH MINISTER »

The country’s Fish Producers’ Organisations discussed with the Marine Minister, Michael Creed, this week the need for a temporary tie-up for the Irish fleet due to the Covid-19 situation and assistance to the industry.

There was, the MARINE TIMES is told, “unity amongst the FPOs and NIFFO” who were also part of the meeting, about the need for assistance. Such unity within the industry is interesting. Responses are awaited. The Minister was criticised for not participating in the last meeting, as reported last week by the MARINE TIMES. There was reluctance to comment on the meeting and its outcome by participants. No decisions have so far been communicated. Listen also in this regard to the Podcast.

ISLAND PROPOSALS TO HELP FISHING »

One of the many downsides created by Covid-19 is the collapse of the fish markets: most Island fishing boats are tied up as they simply can’t sell their catch.

Rhoda Twombly – Comhdháil Oileán na hEireann, the Islands’ Federation says that while time ashore is spent on boat & equipment maintenance, the Island fishers would much prefer to get out and fish. IIMRO (Irish Islands Marine Resource Org) has several proposals to help Island fishers. Urgent measures include direct income support, a repayment holiday on loans for fishing gear until the crisis ends and a fund to help maintain boats in a seaworthy condition.


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 24th April

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    Where Was the Minister?

    While agreement was reached between the nation’s long-time dominant political parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael for a historic Government Coalition, heralded with the statement: “We are an island nation, bound together by solidarity,” the Minister for the Marine was unable to find the time to discuss with the fishing industry the problems caused by the current Covid-19 Pandemic.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcast

    Opportunity to Promote the Fishing Industry Must Be Taken

    Two weeks ago the MARINE TIMES reported proposals made by the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation for development of the domestic fish market. The FPO called on BIM to carry out a ‘Market Evaluation’ of Ireland’s domestic market. Art Kavanagh, QFA, is a Marine Consultant based in Killybegs, Co.Donegal, one of the best-known financiers for the industry, who is credited as being the main innovator in developing banking support for fishing. He has written to Bord Bia and Bord Iascaigh Mhara, calling for stronger and more effective promotional support for fishing.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Getting Answers from the Department of the Marine

    Getting answers to questions about Government decisions on the fishing industry can be difficult. During the week, prior to the meeting between the Department and the industry, in which Minister Creed did not take part, it took four days of constant effort and repeating of the same questions to get answers from the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

    Read the full article here»



EXCLUSIVE MARINE TIMES INTerview »

Interview with EU Fisheries Commissioner Virginijus Sinkevicius

The Marine Times has been offered the exclusive opportunity to interview EU Fisheries Commissioner Virginijus Sinkevicius. Conscious of the answers recently given to the Marine Times by our own Department of Marine and the absence of the Minister himself from a key meeting with fishing representatives in relation to the Covid-19 crisis we put a number of questions to the Commissioner and wish to thank him for the replies received.

"There are currently sufficient funds available in the existing budget. What was most important now, was to give Member States the flexibility to reallocate, at short notice, existing financial resources within their operational programme to the specific measures. But it is true that this possibility will be limited by the budget allocations that Member States have already received, which they cannot exceed."

International News »

Consultation Launched on Proposed Regulations for Wild Wrasse Fishery

A consultation has been launched on proposals to introduce mandatory controls on the harvesting of wild wrasse in Scottish waters. The purpose of this consultation is to seek views about whether the Scottish Government should introduce mandatory measures to control the harvesting of live wrasse for the salmon farming industry. Voluntary measures were introduced in 2018 by the Scottish government, working with the SSPO (Scottish salmon Producers Organisation). Marine Scotland has undertaken an internal review, and engaging with the SSPO and salmon farm operators, they concluded that while most of the original voluntary measures are operating satisfactorily, there is scope to improve the reporting of wrasse fishing activity and merit in introducing more formal harvesting measures - which would bring the wrasse fishery more into line with other Scottish fisheries.


AQUACULTURE CHAIR CALLS FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION BY MINISTER »

IFA Aquaculture Chairman Michael Mulloy has called on the Minister for the Marine to immediately support the sector.

It has suffered a 40-60 per cent loss, he says. “Irish aquaculture producers are suffering cashflow problems with 40-60% losses in turnover compared with the same period last year, as the closure of food service sector across Europe has a direct impact on the industry.”


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 17th April

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    No Ministerial Meeting Yet with the Fishing Industry

    Last week the Irish South and West Fishermen’s Organisation called for a meeting with the Minister for the Marine which, it said, was needed “as soon as possible” to evaluate where in the current EMFF Programme, money not already spent could be reallocated to assist the industry and maintain a regular supply of fish to the Domestic Market.

    Read the full article here»

  • Podcast

    Aquaculture Is Not Getting the Limelight It Should

    IFA Calls For Special Attention

    Aquaculture does not get enough attention as a vital source of seafood supply and must be given access to EMFF Funding during the current COVID crisis. Like all other industries aquaculture must be enabled to survive, the IFA Aquaculture’s Executive, Teresa Morrissey, has told the MARINE TIMES in a wide-ranging interview about the sector.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Lead Story

    Europe Approves Funding for Fishing Industry – Irish Government Must Take Action NOW!

    Marine Minister Michael Creed must take immediate action to implement a newly developed European funding package for hard-hit Irish fishing / aquaculture and seafood sectors. EU ambassadors have agreed the Council's position on a proposal to help tackle the negative impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the fishery and aquaculture sector.

    Read the full article here»



SEAFOOD RECIPE »

Oscar's Seafood Bistro - Fish Finger Sandwich!

Oscar’s Seafood Bistro is located in the historic West-side of Galway City which is also known as the cultural quarter by the local population. Situated on Dominick street with the best of Galways pubs for both live music and a quiet pint as neighbors, Oscars is a perfect bistro to enjoy a selection of real local foods in particular the Seafood freshly caught off the coast of Galway and sourced from local fishermen and the best of Galways fishmongers. Everyone at Oscar's Seafood Bistro is looking forward to the day when they can open their doors gain and welcome all their friends - new and old - to celebrate the end of the current situation we all find ourselves in.

International News »

'Longest Animal Ever' Discovered in Deep-Sea Canyon Off Australia

Underwater explorers claim to have found a 150-foot-long (45 metres) siphonophore — a translucent, stringy creature that, like coral, is made up of smaller critters — living in a submarine canyon off the coast of Australia. It's "seemingly the largest animal ever discovered," the Schmidt Ocean Institute said. The new, record-setting siphonophore was one of several discoveries made by a team aboard the research vessel, Falkor, while exploring deep-sea canyons near Australia's Ningaloo Coast.


Plaice survival in the Irish Seine Net Fishery »

Estimated 87% survival rate obtained. Report by Dr Ronán Cosgrove, Fisheries Conservation Manager, BIM Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, recently completed a plaice survival study in collaboration with Damien Turner and crew on board bottom seine net vessel, MFV Róise Catríona.

Led by BIM’s Martin Oliver, the trial was conducted around 5 hours steaming south of Castletownbere in October 2019. The condition of plaice caught under normal fishing operations was assessed using well established fish vitality/movement and injury assessment protocols. Most of the plaice were in excellent condition with vigorous body movement. Scale and mucus loss were the predominant injuries. Applying observed plaice survival rates from a Danish seine net study conducted in the Skagerrak inferred a survival estimate of 87% for plaice in the Irish fishery.

Objections to Huge 50-Mile Windfarm »

DP Energy Ireland, a company based in Cork which is described as building, developing and managing wind, tidal and solar energy projects and services, has proposed a windfarm on a site reported to be 50kms in width from Dungarvan on the Waterford coast to Cork Harbour. It has sought a foreshore licence for investigative work according to information.

It is understood that objections have been lodged with the Marine Planning Policy and Development, section of the Department of Housing, Planning, and Local Government. The applicant for the foreshore license has been named as Clodagh McGrath/IMEP Limited, who is understood to be the Environment and Consents Manager and the application is “preliminary to Offshore Wind Energy Project known as Inis Ealga Project for DP Energy Ireland Limited.”


Marine Times - Weekly Update: Friday 10th April

A New Approach for Challenging Times

In these extraordinarily difficult times, the MARINE TIMES introduces a new initiative on our website. Each Friday we will publish the WEEKLY UPDATE of News, opinion and comment, including a Podcast interview with an industry figure and a selection of other matters about fishing. Keep in touch by checking the MARINE TIMES WEEKLY UPDATE each Friday.

  • Editorial

    THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FISHING INDUSTRY

    In the current Covid 19 crisis Ireland’s physical island situation has become more apparent to the general public. That we live on an island should have given the country more protection, is an opinion widely expressed and that more rigorous protective decisions could have been made at an earlier stage.

    Read the full article here»

  • Main Story & Podcast

    IRISH SOUTH AND WEST CALLS FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION TO ENSURE FUTURE OF FISHING INDUSTRY

    “Fishing is a designated critical service and for the benefit of all our societies must be supported,” the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation has said in proposals made for ‘Domestic Market Development’ and a request for Marine Minister Michael Creed to engage in discussions with the fishing industry.

    Listen to the podcast here»

  • Quare Times Lads

    by Art Kavanagh

    Reality comes home with a bang when markets close and we are advised to put the Keys in the Drawer and stop fishing. The stark reality of the current situation was best described by John Nolan of the Castletownbere Fishermens’ Co Op when comparing the previous price of White Pollack at €3.50 per KG with the £0.40 paid at Newlyn Market.

    Read the full article here»



SEAFOOD RECIPE »

The Fish Box / Flannery's Seafood Bar have given us details of their Superprawn Salad ... it's delish!

The Fish Box Dingle opened its doors during the summer of 2018. But long before that, fishing has been at the centre of the Flannery’s life and and is embedded in their nature. The fishing industry has been ever present in their lives as they are the fourth generation of a truly fishing revolved family. The father, Michael, has been a fisherman since 1975. In 2000 he opted to build his own 35 meter trawler named ‘Emerald Dawn.’ In 2007, we sold ‘Emerald Dawn’ and opted to move on to a more efficient 24 meter ‘Cú Na Mara’, which is Gaelic for ‘Hound of the Sea.’ In 2011, Michael took a step back and allowed his sons Patrick and Micheál to have a more leading role. Michael took to a more managerial role while their mother, Deirdre, opened her own café. Since then, both Patrick and Micheál have been searching for ways to optimise the value for the Cú Na Mara’s catch. After much thought, they decided to try and amalgamate their parent’s professions and open their very own Seafood Bar.

International News »

European Parliament Chairman says ‘Red Tape Regulations’ on Fishermen Must be Reduced

The Chairman of the European Parliament’s Committee on Fisheries has made a strong attack on the amount of regulations with which fishermen have to deal. 40-year-old Pierre Karleskind. a French oceanographer and politician, stressed the need to ‘reduce red tape’ and make European maritime and fisheries regulations simpler, reducing administrative burden. “I don’t think there is a sector that has to face as many regulations as fishermen do. Professionals almost need a PhD to become a fisherman,” he told Europêche’s General Assembly, the representative body for fishermen in the EU, claiming to represent 45,000 vessels, artisanal and large-scale and 80,000 fishermen. It has 16 member organisations in 10 European countries.”


Crisis point: brown crab fishery prices plummet »

The Brown crab fishery is in crisis as fishermen are facing a reduction of up to 80% in their earnings due to the current closure of the Chinese markets.

The lack of access to markets in China was initially due to the different approaches of the EU and the People’s Republic of China when it comes to permitted levels of cadmium in crustaceans, the maximum legal limit in China is much lower than in Europe or other countries. But now that issue has been eclipsed by the rapid spread of the Corona virus and the subsequent enforced restrictions on the movement of goods. A spokesperson for the National Inshore Fishermen’s Association (NIFA) and its sister group the National Inshore Fishermen’s Organisation (NIFO) described the current issues facing the crab sector, particularly market access to China “as probably the most immediate and concerning issue currently facing their membership and probably the wider inshore sector to date.

Area 6a Monk and Megrim survey planned for April »

The third leg of the annual Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS2020) will be carried out by the Marine Institute from 11th April to 20th April 2020 to the north and northwest coast of Ireland. Marine Notice No. 08 of 2020 has been issued to notify all shipowners, fishing vessel owners, skippers, fishers, yachtsmen and seafarers, of the survey’s locations and dates.

The 65metre research vessel Celtic Explorer will carry out the IAMS demersal trawl survey using a Jackson trawl which will consist of approximately 50 otter trawls of 60 minutes duration in ICES area 6a. In Marine Notice No. 08 of 2020, the Marine Institute requests that commercial fishing and other marine operators keep a 3 nautical mile radius area around the tow points clear of any gear or apparatus during the survey period outlined above. While there is no statutory provision for the loss of gear at sea, the Marine Institute will make every effort to avoid gear adequately marked according to legislation that may be encountered in the notified areas.