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International News

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT CHAIRMAN SAYS ‘RED TAPE REGULATIONS’ ON FISHERMEN MUST BE REDUCED

The Chairman of the European Parliament’s Committee on Fisheries has made a strong attack on the amount of regulations with which fishermen have to deal. 40-year-old Pierre Karleskind. a French oceanographer and politician, stressed the need to ‘reduce red tape’ and make European maritime and fisheries regulations simpler, reducing administrative burden. “I don’t think there is a sector that has to face as many regulations as fishermen do. Professionals almost need a PhD to become a fisherman,” he told Europêche’s General Assembly, the representative body for fishermen in the EU, claiming to represent 45,000 vessels, artisanal and large-scale and 80,000 fishermen. It has 16 member organisations in 10 European countries.”

NEW ARRANGEMENTS FOR MANAGING QUOTAS IN SCOTLAND

The Scottish Government has decided to introduce a new system of quota management for Scottish fisheries which may replace the role of the FPOs. The project, which will run until the end of 2021, will see the establishment of new legal entities called Quota Management Groups, according to a government statement.

A rare occasion - a new boat launched in Portavogie (especially amidst a global pandemic - Rebecca James owned by James Orr. Photo courtesy NIFHA

SALMON TAX UNLIKELY TO GO AHEAD IN NORWAY

The Norwegian Government’s attempt to impose a 40 per cent flat rate tax on the country’s fish farming companies - dubbed ‘the salmon tax’ – has been opposed by the country’s Labour Party, the main political opposition. Instead it wants to see a tax based on output or on how much land and fjord water a fish farm takes up, with most of the revenues going to coastal communities.

MAJOR EXPANSION OF THE PORT OF HANSTHOLM NEAR COMPLETION

With a EUR 55 million three-year major expansion plan set for completion this summer, the Danish Port of Hanstholm is poised to become Europe’s leading consumer fishing port and the European gateway for Britain’s fishing industry.

With the largest concentration of fishing industries on the continent as well as being home to Denmark’s largest fish auction, the Port of Hanstholm is on course to become Europe’s leading consumer fishing port with the completion of a EUR 55 million three-year major expansion plan this summer.

The expansion will bring a new basin, a new entry to northern Denmark, increased quay area and water depth, better navigation conditions and an expanded hinterland. It is also expected to attract 450 new jobs to Denmark’s youngest port in the coming years at an economic hub that already employs 1,000 and another 1,300 people in secondary industries.

With vessels landing more than 600 tonnes of fish a day for human consumption and industrial use, 2019 saw the value of fish coming through the port scaling EUR 140 million. With some of the North Sea’s best fishing grounds within range, the Port of Hanstholm boasts an ideal location for a top European fishing port. Fish is sold to customers all over Europe, with rules ensuring that fresh fish from Hanstholm must reach their destinations in the EU within 24 hours of sale.

Attracting both foreign and Danish vessels, the fish auction trades more than 40,000 tonnes of consumer fish annually, which amounts to EUR 67 million in revenue. Among fishermen, the Port of Hanstholm is well-known for offering the highest prices in Northern Europe. This is not least due to the vast network of buyers in Hanstholm and a state-of-the-art fish auction with a very high quantity of goods.