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New Fisheries Act Becomes Law In Britain

The UK’s first major domestic fisheries legislation in nearly forty years passed into law in late November as the Fisheries Bill received Royal assent following its ten-month transition through Parliament. The Fisheries Act 2020 gives the UK full control of its fishing waters for the first time since 1973, ending the automatic rights for EU vessels to fish in UK waters. It enables the UK to control fishing activity through a new foreign vessel licensing regime, according to UK Environment Secretary George Eustice: “This is a huge moment for the UK fishing industry. We will now take back control of our waters out to 200 nautical miles or the median line. The Fisheries Act makes clear our intention to continue to operate on the world stage as a leading, responsible, independent coastal state. We will protect our precious marine environment, whilst ensuring a fairer share of fishing opportunities for UK fishermen. By swiftly responding to the latest scientific advice and needs of our fishing industries we will secure a thriving future for our coastal communities.”

Fire Causes Major Fish Escape In Tasmania

At least 50,000 salmon escaped into the wild following a fire at fish farm in Southern Tasmania.Huon Aquaculture said the fire melted part of the pen and allowef the fish to slip through into the open sea. A third of a pen burnt through, melting the pen infrastructure above and just below the waterline the company said, estimating a loss of between 50,000 – 52,000 4kg of fish.

Iceland Acquiring In Ireland

Iceland Seafood International, one of the fastest growing seafood companies in Europe, with interests in Iceland, the UK, Spain, France, Germany and also in the United States has completed the acquisition of the Irish company Carr & Sons in a deal worth almost £6 million at a quoted purchase price of €6.5 million. Iceland Seafood is also reported to have acquired a 33 per cent share in the fish processing plant, Oceanpath in Ireland, for €9m.