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Marine Times - This Island Nation : Weekly Podcast

    THE DYING WISH OF FISHERMAN IS HONOURED

    Hello, Tom MacSweeney here with this week’s MARINE TIMES THIS ISLAND NATION PODCAST. A fisherman from County Down has given an example, through his dying bequest how North/South friendship of the sea can cross the Border between North and South and the support of the Newry, Mourne & Down District Council, for his wish has further underlined that the divide between the two parts of Ireland does not need to exist when friendship can surpass it.

    The Old Head of Kinsale dominates the South Cork coastline. Eleven miles off that headland, the liner Lusitania was sunk by a German submarine on the 7th of May 1915 during World War One. Of the 1,962 passengers and crew aboard, 1,198 lost their lives.

    A davit is part of the system to launch lifeboats from ships and one of them, from the Lusitania, has been given to the Lusitania Museum in the 200-year-old Signal Tower at the Old Head of Kinsale… It is a good story of North-South co-operation.

    That story is how I lead off this week’s Podcast from my THIS ISLAND NATION radio programme (click on photo to listen), which also includes the fascinating story of love and romance amongst the Tysties on the Irish coastal clifftops.

    There is always something interesting to hear about Irish maritime life.

    Romance, Cliff Tops and Hunter Killers

    In this edition of the programme, we go from a story of romance and love on the coastal clifftops of Ireland to the problems which submarines chasing each other could be causing to – and killing- whales. Coincidentally, when the latter story came to me I had been reading a book “Hunter Killers” by Ian Ballantyne, the “untold story of the Royal Navy’s most secret service.” The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group is investigating the number of Cuvier’s beaked whales arriving on Irish shores and whether the noise of sonar pinging as submarines of different nations chase each other off the Irish coastline, could be causing whales to die from “the bends.” A more positive aspect of the marine environment is romance of the Tystie on Irish clifftops. The way history repeats itself is happening off the Mayo coastline and then there is the davit from the Lusitania, returned to Kinsale by the dying wish of a County Down fisherman and, you can hear about the “Queen of the North Atlantic.”

    As ever, a wide variety of topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

    Marine Times - This Island Nation : Weekly Podcast

      A VOICE HAS GONE SILENT

      Hello, Tom MacSweeney here with this week’s MARINE TIMES THIS ISLAND NATION PODCAST. I was in Norway, meeting an Irishman who is leading the development of the most modern land-based farmed salmon production facility in that country when the news came through that Richie Flynn had died.

      “A voice for the industry has gone silent, he will be missed,” we both agreed. This man, who has worked on other fish farming developments internationally, knew of Richie and his voice for aquaculture. That voice had been heard not only in Ireland, but around the world..

      Richie had a vision of Ireland that was passionate about the marine and aquaculture, advocating community and political engagement and understanding. That vision is very much needed in an island nation where Government and State officials too often appear to have landbound minds.

      His passionate voice is now, regrettably, silent and will be very much missed. Listen to my PODCAST this week (click on photo), which is a tribute to Richie Flynn.

      WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO THE TAOISEACH IF YOU HAD THE OPPORTUNITY?

      Hello and welcome to this week’s Marine Times Podcast from THIS ISLAND NATION radio - Tom MacSweeney reporting....

      This Podcast combines features from the programme and news reports about the maritime sector …… Listen to the Podcast by clicking on the photo below.

      On this edition the Managing Director of one of the biggest boat sales companies in Ireland tells me what he would like to say to Taoiseach Lea Varadkar why Ireland should have a Marine Minister. I am not dismissive of politicians, a democracy needs politics, but an island nation needs more dedicated attention from its politicians to its maritime interests. Gerry Salmon is Managing Director of MGM Boats, one of the biggest boat sales companies in Ireland. The company headquarters is based in Dublin and when I met him, he told me what he would like to say to the Taoiseach.

      If you would like to listen to the full programme it can be heard on this player ....

        Welcome to the first edition of our new
        MARINE TIMES – THIS ISLAND NATION WEEKLY PODCAST
        Tom MacSweeney reporting....

        This Podcast combines features from the programme and news reports about the maritime sector …… Listen to the Podcast by clicking on the photo below.

        On this month’s edition of the MARINE TIMES, for the month of August, there are photographs of the Sliney family of Ballycotton on the East Cork coastline presenting the medals won by their grandfather to the Cork Public Museum… He was Patrick, known locally in the village and surrounding area, as ‘Patsy’ – the Coxswain who led the Ballycotton Lifeboat on the most famous rescue in Irish lifeboat history…. You can hear his voice on this Podcast, a unique opportunity to hear the man himself describe how this amazing rescue was carried out……. And also on the Podcast, Rhoda Twombly of Comhdhail Oilean na hEireann will describe just how busy the offshore islands are this month

        If you would like to listen to the full programme it can be heard on this player ....

        Daunt Rock Rescue Medals

        The most famous Irish lifeboat rescue is amongst the topics on this edition of THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme, which reports from the ceremony where the medals awarded to the Coxswain who led that rescue were handed over by his family to a museum, so that the story could be preserved for future generations. The voice of the Coxswain, Patsy Sliney of Ballycotton Lifeboat, describing how the rescue was carried out, is broadcast on the programme. Also discussed on THIS ISLAND NATION is the big increase in motorboating in Irish waters caused, says the Managing Director of one of the biggest boat sales companies in Ireland, by people being “cash rich, but time poor.” A heartfelt plea from the Irish boating industry to the Taoiseach to take notice of the maritime sector and what the Government has ignored in the marine sphere, is amongst other stories. The RNLI warns about the dangerous activities of young people who are ‘tombstoning’ and we hear that the offshore islands have a lot to offer this August

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        New Era

        Achill island to lead the way in the production of a new era of all-electric sailing yachts. There are electric cars, why not electric yachts? That is the view of the Mayo consortium whose development of these boats is reported on this edition of THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme, presented by Tom MacSweeney. Also on the programme BirdWatch Ireland says that one good Tern deserves another and Irish Water Safety tells the story of 109 family tragedies.

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        'Water Always Moves'

        “People should remember that using a boat is like driving a car on a road that moves. The water always moves. That needs to be remembered.” The Lifeboat Operations Manager at Lough Ree Lifeboat Station has good advice on this edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, as he discusses why so many boat users go aground in Lough Ree. And there is also the unusual story of the shipping line owned and run by farmers, which is celebrating a 40-year connection with Ireland.

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        Beat the English

        A certain way to be accepted in Ireland is to beat the English. That’s what one of the world’s top yacht designers says on this edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION. New Zealander Ron Holland looks back on 40 years in Ireland in a wide-ranging interview in which he has a message for young people – “don’t be defeated by school exam results.” He never passed his he says!

        From Iceland, Dr.Simon Berrow reports on the circumnavigation of that island nation by the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group and there are reports from Irish Water Safety and Angling Ireland.

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        Marine Plastic Waste

        The Little Skellig Island off Kerry is being covered by plastic waste. But the problem is that it is being brought ashore by Gannets building their nests. This is one result of the 12 million tons of plastic being dumped in the oceans every year. This edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, reports this story and the attempts by an Irish project to re-use marine plastic waste.

        The programme also hears about a scheme encouraging young people to take up angling and all the news from the offshore islands.

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        The Wonderful Ilen

        On this edition - the story of ILEN, Ireland’s last surviving, traditional, wooden sailing and trading boat. We’ll also hear about World Oceans Day and about the new National Drowning Prevention Strategy.

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        Maritime Safety and Rescue Equipment

        There are over 170,000 users of an Irish-developed maritime safety and rescue system worldwide, but Irish people are much slower to use it. On this edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, we hear from the man who developed what is regarded around the world as a system which fills a critical gap in maritime safety awareness. But why are the Irish so slow to use it, even though it is free-of-charge?

        The programme also hears that offshore island residents are not happy with the Government’s continuous delays in working with them on long-term planning for the future of the islands and the programme joins in the campaign to get rid of plastic from the world’s oceans

        These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        100th Edition of This Island Nation

        The 100th edition of THIS ISLAND NATION brings news of the end of an Irish maritime era, the huge task of removing the natural gas rigs from Ireland’s first offshore exploration discovery at Kinsale Head. The programme also hears of an Irish expedition to remind the Icelanders, as they start to hut fin whales again, that whales are not the property of one nation. As Summer approaches, the importance of Beach Lifeguards is discussed and how many lives and injuries they have saved is revealed. These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this, the 100th edition of the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Marine Times Deputy Editor, Tom MacSweeney.

        Reconnecting the Land and Sea Communities

        Reconnecting the land and sea communities, the first broadcast of a ballad about the R116 Coast Guard helicopter tragedy, a plea to observe and report the arrival of swallows, cuckoos and swifts and to protect the last of the corncrakes, angling news from all over Ireland and what is happening on our offshore island communities. These are amongst the topics from coast-to-coast on this edition of the maritime programme for Ireland - THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Tom MacSweeney, Deputy Editor, Marine Times.

        Who Was Molly Malone?

        MOLLY MALONE AND DUBLIN’S COCKLES AND MUSSELS: Molly Malone is not a real person, purely fictitious, but her name became synonymous with Dublin because of cockles and mussels and the raw consumption of them caused serious problems for thousands of Dubliners. That is one of the stories which writer and ecologist, Richard Nairn, will be telling us about on THIS ISLAND NATION programme. With two colleagues, David Jeffrey, Bob Goodbody, he has produced a book “Dublin Bay- Nature and History…” published by Collins Press. It is a good read, dealing with questions such as - How was Bull Island former in Dublin Bay??? Who was Molly Malone and why are cockles and mussels so much associated with Dublin….?? What about Dublin Bay Prawns?? And what about the Vikings and Captain Bligh in Dublin Bay ?? Worth reading and worth listening to. A wide-ranging and interesting edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Tom MacSweeney.

        Superstitions of the Sea

        The ways in which fishermen try to avoid misfortune at sea are told by Bairbe Ni Fhloinn who lectures in Irish folklore at University College, Dublin, on this edition of THIS ISLAND NATION, the maritime programme for Ireland, presented by the Deputy Editor of the Marine Times, Tom MacSweeney, and supported by the paper. The programme also tells how the people of Rosslare remember the 61 passengers and crew who were killed in the Aer Lingus crash off Tuskar Rock 50 years ago and hears the story of the Black Guillemot and about 29 years of watching birds on Rockabill Island. A wide-ranging and interesting edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Tom MacSweeney.

        Does the Boating Community Take Enough Notice of Safety Issues?

        IRISH WATER SAFETY reveals that 62% of all drowning fatalities occur inland and just 38% at sea on the new edition of THIS ISLAND NATION radio programme tonight on CRY104FM at 6.30 pm and www,cry104FM online and stations throughout Ireland this week. The RNLI reports on the latest news from Irish lifeboats and the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group will examine the story and history of ‘MUC MHARA’ - IRELAND’S SMALLEST WHALE. And the story of the one-legged Irish sailor from Cork who attacked a King of England will be told. WELCOME TO KINVARA – THE 11TH STATION IN THE COMMUNITY OF THE SEA: Kinvara FM Community Radio in County Galway, broadcasting every Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon to 8 p.m. on 92.4FM is the latest station to join “the community of the sea” through THIS ISLAND NATION programme. From Sunday, March 11, the programme will be broadcast fortnightly on Sundays at 1 p.m. This brings to 11 the number of stations now broadcasting the maritime programme reporting on the culture, history, tradition and modern developments of MARITIME IRELAND. A wide-ranging and interesting edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Tom MacSweeney.

        The Fishmonger Who Talked to the Queen (... and other stories)

        On this edition, the man who made international news when he told Queen Elizabeth that a monkfish has a face like a “mother-in-law” talks about what it is like to sell fish. Pat O’Connell calls for more public education about the fishing industry and says that all sections of it need to be working together for its future, which is not helped, he says, by politicians who fail to stand-up for it against European regulations. The Islands’ Federation says that offshore islanders have just as much rights to travel facilities as any citizen of the mainland; Birdwatch Ireland warns about the future of the seas and Fisheries Ireland encourages youngsters to go angling. A wide-ranging and interesting edition of the maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION, presented by Tom MacSweeney.

        The Convict Transporation Ships to Australia

         

        The convict ships transported 165,000 prisoners to Australia in the 80 years between 1788 and 1868. They were mostly men, but 25,566 women were also transported, though not all were prisoners. Some went voluntarily. The last convict ship, the Hougoumont, docked in the port city of Fremantle in Western Australia on January 9, 1869 – ending the era of transportation. It had been at sea for 89 days on a 14,000-nautical-mile voyage. Amongst the prisoners were 68 Fenians.

        Fred Rea, owner and Publisher of the Irish Scene magazine in Western Australia and one of the organisers of the first 10-day Irish festival in Australia, held to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the ending of transportation, tells the story of these ships in a riveting account and asks why there was no commemoration of the historic date in Ireland.

        THE RADIO PROGRAMME FOR MARITIME IRELAND

        THIS ISLAND NATION PROGRAMME LIBRARY All programmes No. 1- 99 available on the CRY PODCAST site: https://www.mixcloud.com/CRY1…/playlists/this-island-nation/

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